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August 2017

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Career Opportunity

Residential Counselors

(Youth Service Workers)

 

Job#: 2017-10

If you are interested in making a positive impact on the lives of Virginia’s youth, then we want you to become part of our Team!  Rural Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility located in Jarratt, Virginia seeks positive role models to work directly with adolescent boys and girls in a psychiatric residential treatment program.  The Youth Service Worker is responsible for role-modeling healthy behavior, teaching life skills, administering a trauma informed behavioral support program, and leading youth in and participating in social, cultural, and recreational activities.  This position supervises youth in the residential unit and on off-campus activities and appointments.

Must possess the availability to work weekends, evenings, holidays, and nights.  Supreme flexibility required. 

Seeking candidates with Bachelor’s Degrees in Psychology, Sociology or other Human Services field.   Experience will be considered in lieu of a degree.

Compensation package includes 401(k) retirement plan & employer sponsored health, dental, vision & life insurance.  JBHS is a Drug Free Workplace.  Successful applicants must pass a pre-employment drug screen and criminal background screening.  EOE.  Positions opened until filled.

E-mail cover letter and resume to:

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services
Attn: Chris Thompson
Job # 2017-10
E-mail:careers@jacksonfeild.org

This Paid Political Advertisement does not represent an endorsement by Emporia News. Emporia News does not endorse candidates for any political office.

  1. Irene Holt "Miss Hope" Morrison

    Irene Holt “Miss Hope” Morrison died Tuesday, August 29, 2017 at Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital, Roanoke, VA.

    She was born December 21,1926 in Pulaski, VA, the second of five children to the late Randall Clinton Holt and Elsie Ann Hall Holt.

    She graduated from high school at the Christiansburg Industrial Institute, Christiansburg, VA in 1945 and attended and graduated Morristown College, Morristown, TN in 1947.  Upon completion of her degree at Morristown, Irene had received a scholarship to study pre-med at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA, with the hopes of one day becoming a doctor. Upon returning to Pulaski, VA, after graduating from Morristown, she found her mother gravely ill and decided to stay in the area to assist in caring for her ailing mother, father and two minor sisters. Her mother died shortly after Irene's return from Morristown.  She was recruited for a position as a teacher, receiving an appointment to the one-room Rich Hill School in Allisonia, VA. At Rich Hill, Irene wasn't much older than many of her students, and was younger than some, but commanded respect from both students and parents alike.  On her first day of instruction, she informed the students that her name was “Miss Holt,” however, the students insisted on calling her “Miss Hope” - to many of whom she was their “Hope.” During her time at Rich Hill she encouraged the parents to petition the School Board to provide a bus for the students so that they could pursue furthering their education beyond Rich Hill.

    Irene continued to further her own education by attending  Virginia Union University in Richmond, VA and eventually obtaining her Bachelor's of Science in Education in 1977.  She pursued her degree by attending various colleges in the Summers that included Virginia State University, she was the first African American undergraduate student to enroll at the then Radford College, Radford, VA, and Virginia Tech. She also took continuing education courses at New River Community College, Wytheville Community College and through the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.

    Throughout her career she was certified and taught many grade levels and served as the acting principal at Calfee Training School.  After de-segregation she served as the librarian at Claremont Elementary School and as a computer instructor to the elementary aged children at Claremont.

    On June 16, 1950, she eloped and married a friend from high school, George Emmet Morrison, Jr. After nearly 9 and one half years their first child was born and nearly five years after that, they completed their family with the addition of the second and final child. Her family was her pride and her most important accomplishment.

    In her early teen years Irene professed her faith in Jesus Christ and joined New Century Methodist Church in Pulaski, VA.  After her marriage she joined Mt. Pleasant Methodist Church in Dublin, VA and was instrumental in the merger of Mt. Pleasant and Dublin Methodist Church into Dublin United Methodist Church on April 19, 1970.

    In the three churches she belonged to she was a beloved and active member. From 1970 on at Dublin United Methodist Church she served as a Sunday School Teacher, member of the Council on Ministries, Administrative Board – where she was eventually Chairman, she was a member of the Adult Choir, a member of the Seekers group of the United Methodist Women, Cheerful Adults and helped to establish the church's first Prison Ministry.  Irene was also a Certified Lay Speaker for the United Methodist Church and served as Pulpit Supply for the Wytheville District UMC. She was a member of the Pulaski-Dublin Cluster and was instrumental in organizing area participation for the Annual Revival at Page's Camp Meeting House.

    For the Holston Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church Irene served multiple Bishops on the Board of Episcopacy, COSROW (Commission on the Status and Role of Women), Higher Education Committee and as a District Delegate to the Holston Annual Conference.

    She and her family worked together in many community organizations, including the GEM City Garden Club – where she served many years as the Club's President, Federated Colored Women's Club, Pulaski County Democrats – serving as President of the Democratic Women's Club for many years and a Delegate to numerous District and State Conventions, Pulaski County Clean Community Council, Church Women United (President), Pulaski County Retired Teachers Organization, Pulaski County NAACP, National, Virginia and Pulaski County Education Associations, Christiansburg Industrial Institute Alumni Association, and the Red Cross of Pulaski County.

    She was preceded in death by her husband of nearly 42 years, George E. Morrison, Jr. her parents, Randall C. Holt and Elise A. Hall Holt, two brothers: Randolph Holt (infant) and Cecil E. Holt, one sister Mary D. Holt Davis (Alonzo), and nephew Randall Holt. She was also preceded in death by her parents-in-laws Mr. and Mrs. George E. (Rosa) Morrison, Sr., sisters-in-law Mrs. Charlotte M. Williams, Mrs. Helen M. Hampton (Kenneth), Miss Kathleen C. Morrison, Mrs. Clara M. Booth (William), brothers-in-law Mr. Winslow Morrison and Mr. Nathan J. Sokolow.

    She is survived by her children Kathleen Georgianna Morrison and George Emmett Morrison, III, her sister Mrs. Gladys Holt Sokolow and sister-in-law Mrs. Mattie P. M. Holmes, her God-daughter Mrs. Sharon B. Dabney (Trey), and nieces and nephews Jacqueline Moore (Julius III), Kenneth Hampton, Sandra Pittman Dobson (Spouse), Randall Grey (Sherie), Tyrone Holmes (Jackie), Alethiea Williams Taylor, Charlayne Williams Thompkins, Joanna Hampton Claytor, Marcellus Hampton (Laurice), Troy Hampton (Thelma), Emmett Hampton (Edith), Rosalia Williams Davis, Brenda Lewis-Holmes, William Booth, Sharon Booth Dabney (Trey), Edgar J. Claytor, Bateman Davis (Jim), Kenneth Holt, Sandra Holt, Derrick Holt, numerous great-nieces and great-nephews and a host of other relatives and friends to cherish her memory.

    The family will greet visitors on Sunday, September 3, 2017, beginning at 1:30 pm before a Celebration of Life Service at 3:00 pm at Dublin United Methodist Church, 424 E. Main Street, Dublin, Virginia. Interment will follow the service at Highland Memory Gardens. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests donations to the Irene Holt Morrison Scholarship Fund, c/o Dublin United Methodist Church, 424 E. Main Street, Dublin, VA 24084.

  2. Around the World in Three Blocks

    Petersburg, August 17, 2017 - Crater Community Hospice (CCH) is offering an evening of dining and strolling in Old Town Petersburg with "Around the World in Three Blocks," a progressive dinner, on Sunday, September 10, 2017.  Proceeds from the event will support CCH's Family Respite Care program.

    The evening begins at 4pm at Andrade's International Restaurant with appetizers and spirits.  From there, guests will stroll to Maria's Old Town 21 for dinner.  Following dinner, guests will head to the Petersburg Area Art League (PAAL) for coffee and dessert.  Flutist Iris Schwartz will perform at PAAL.  The evening will include door prizes and a raffle. 

    "Once again, Crater Community Hospice looks forward to building community support for our programs by showcasing and supporting the local businesses in our community," says E. Jane Elliott, Chair of the Crater Community Hospice Board of Directors.  Last Spring, the organization hosted a dinner and auction at Farmers Market Restaurant and generated over $13,000.  Last February, the organization partnered with Blue Willow Tea Room and earned 10% return on select purchases.  "It's a win-win-win," says Elliott, "CCH's families will benefit from additional services that this event will support; guests will get to spend an evening enjoying Old Town; and Old Town merchants will get exposure to new patrons." 

    The Family Respite Care program was initiated by CCH two years ago, and supports families who are physically and emotionally exhausted from caring 24/7 for their loved ones.  Respite care offers families relief with additional hands-on help with caregiving.  Families use this relief time to address their own health needs, take care of other personal business, or get some uninterrupted rest.  CCH's Family Respite Care program offers up to 24 hours of care to families receiving the organization's hospice services.

    Limited tickets are available.  A $65 per person contribution is in part tax-deductible. For tickets, contact CCH Development Director Deborah Williamson at (804) 526-4300 or dwilliamson@cratercommunityhospice.org

  3. Nurse Career Fair Set for September 7th

    SOUTH HILL, VA– VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital will be hosting a Nurse Career Fair on Thursday, September 7th from 1:00PM – 7:00PM at the CMH Education Center, located at 125 Buena Vista Circle in South Hill.

    As VCU Health CMH grows, so does the need for dedicated nurses.  Nursing opportunities for new and experienced nurses may be available in:  Medical-Surgical, Emergency, Oncology, Surgical Services, Long Term Care, Cardiac Intensive Care and Home Health/Hospice.

    VCU Health CMH’s new facility is set to open on November 11, 2017.

    To learn more about nursing at VCU Health CMH, or to view and apply for current opportunities, visit vcuhealth.org/careers/start-your-career-search or contact Terri Coker at 434-447-3151, ext. 3471 or terri.coker@vcuhealth.org.

     

    At VCU Health CMH, we are building a healthier community, together.

  4. Freeman Community Empowerment Day

    The 4th Annual Freeman Community Empowerment Day was held on Saturday, August 19th from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm at the Inspiration Center (formerly Meljo’s), 21391 Governor Harrison Parkway, Freeman, Virginia. WHLQ 105.5 Hot Joy Radio was elated to partner with The Freeman Coalition. WHLQ 105.5 FM’s piece was to provide the community with inspirational music, dance, and new clothing for children K-12. We had some great people assist us with this endeavor.

    First, we had performers; Inspired to Dance, Daughters of Zion, The Bowman Family, Minister Naomi Castel, Author Rita Odom Moseley, Mike Alston and more share their gifts of dance and song. We thank them for their awe-inspiring presentations.

    Second, we would like to thank Angel’s (Minister Antoinette House donated 200 pieces of clothing), Mayor Harrington, and the staff of WHLQ for donations of new clothing for children from K-12 grades. They went above and beyond what we expected.

    Third, we are also grateful to Thompson Hauling, Inc. (flatbed for stage), Joseph Mitchell (25 vacation give-a-way), Ministers Donna Ray and Pate McCoy (financial donation), and Mike Alston for our sound system. And most of all we thank the community for showing up in great numbers. Thanks again to all of you for your support and we look to do it all over again next year.

  5. "Explain to the Kids"

    How do so many people
    That claim to be so wise
    Come to us with their decisions
    Then holler back with suprise!
     
    Well the south trys putting down the north
    So this time their side I'll take
    Just to show you it matters not where you live
    But what common sense you make.
     
    The south has found its schools are pitiful
    Both the buildings and education in decay
    Yet our local leaders haven't a clue
    To regroup how will they pay.
     
    Now the problem didn't start yesterday
    Its been around for quite a while
    Yes several administrations saw it go down
    Yet the best they could do was smile.
     
    There's no doubt that we'll need money
    In fact most likely lots
    Still we can't go the the end of the rainbow
    and pick up those big pots.
     
    Now I'm not saying we can't do this
    though our children will suffer til we do
    Yes the money is needed to complete this job
    Not for the many projects quite new.
     
    The slavery museum and celetery clean up
    Are wants that shouldn't overcede
    It is far more important for each child around
    To get the education they need.
     
    Your talk of  moving statues and flags
    Is brought on by an unknown amount
    It might be wise to find a supervisor
    that can do an actual count.
     
    Yes you have started many new projects
    Yet to finish one might be nice
    It does little good to start another
    Until you've raised the first ones price.
     
    Roy E. Schepp
  6. Jackson-Feild Hosts Bible School

    Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services hosts quarterly Bible Schools each year. Led by our full-time chaplain Rev. Dr. Robin Jones, residents are encouraged, but not required, to participate. 

    Jones selects a theme for each week-long session, and conducts daily activities that encourage residents to embark on their spiritual journey.  Her goal is to help children make sense of their experiences and help them understand and, hopefully accept, God’s saving grace.

    An important part of Jackson-Feild’s Bible School is the service component. Residents make items and donate them to help others.  Prior recipients have been our military serving overseas, victims of natural disasters and residents at senior centers.

    During this recent session of Bible School, the Jackson-Feild boys and girls made “silly socks” which will be given to residents of local nursing homes.  The children had a great time decorating the socks and are pleased to have had a hand in helping others.

  7. How to Volunteer and Donate Responsibly to Support Hurricane Harvey Survivors

    When natural or human-caused disasters strike, people look for ways to help survivors.

    As we struggle to find ways to help our fellow human beings, we must weigh our options, and our feelings, carefully.

    Before heading to a disaster area, consider the complexities of the situation. To make the most of your efforts and assist impacted communities best, consider these tips for donating and volunteering responsibly:

    Cash is the fastest way to assist disaster survivors. Cash offers voluntary agencies the most flexibility in obtaining the most-needed resources.

    • Many charities specialize in providing relief in disaster areas, yet they face significant financial barriers to getting their staff, equipment, and supplies into impacted areas.
    • Donations helps put experienced disaster responders on the ground, and gives them the tools they need to help survivors recover.
    • Organizations typically prefer cash donations because they allow organizations to:
      • Purchase food, water, medicine, and equipment from secure and familiar supply chains
      • Buy materials locally — which can help rebuild the local economy
      • Conserve resources — money is always necessary and cheap to send, but the cost to ship material supplies can be expensive.
        • Remember, material supplies such as used clothing, miscellaneous household items, and mixed or perishable food require helping agencies to redirect volunteer labor away from providing direct one-on-one assistance to sort, package, transport, warehouse, and distribute items that may not meet the needs of disaster survivors.
        •  

    Donate through a trusted organization.  At the national level, many voluntary, faith- and community-based organizations are active in disasters, and are trusted ways to donate in order to help disaster survivors.

    If you’d like to donate to assist those affected by disaster, National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (www.nvoad.org) is the best place to start.

    Affiliate with existing non-profit organizations before coming to the disaster area.Immediately following a disaster, a community can become easily overwhelmed by the amount of generous people who want to help. Contacting and affiliating with an established organization will help to ensure that you are appropriately trained and supported to respond in the most effective way.

    • The impulse to help when others who are suffering is commendable.  However, volunteering inside a disaster area can be dangerous, stressful work in extreme environments.
    • If you’d like to volunteer to assist those affected by disaster, National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (www.nvoad.org) is the best place to start

    Do not self deploy. Seeing images of disaster may compel you to head to the impacted area. Don’t underestimate the complexity of working in a disaster area. Until a need has been identified and the local community impacted has requested support, volunteers should not enter.

    • Be sure to affiliate with existing voluntary organization before coming to the disaster area, and that organization has been asked to respond.  
    • Wait until it is safe to travel to volunteer sites and opportunities have been identified.
    • Once assigned a position, make sure you have been given an assignment and are wearing proper safety gear for the task.

    Be patient.  Recovery lasts a lot longer than the media attention.

    • There will be volunteer needs for many months, often years, after the disaster - especially when the community enters the long-term recovery period.
  8. Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center Announces July Employee of the Month

    Emporia, VA – Christina Pope has been named the Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) Employee of the Month for July 2017. Ms. Pope, who works in SVRMC’s Surgical Services Department, has been employed at SVRMC since May 2007.

    Each month employees are nominated for demonstrating excellence in one of ten Standards of Behavior; the highlighted Standard of the Month for July was Safety Awareness.  Ms. Pope’s nomination included the following statement:  “Christina speaks up for safety and encourages others to do the same; she follows up to ensure that safety issues have been addressed and resolved. The safety of our patients, staff, and facility are of high importance to Christina. She is well deserving of the July Employee of the Month for the ‘Safety Awareness’ standard.”

    As SVRMC’s July Employee of the Month, Ms. Pope received a certificate of recognition, balloons,  cookies to share with her co-workers, a cash award, and a chance to be selected as SVRMC’s 2017 Employee of the Year.

  9. Social Security Announces New Online Service for Replacement Social Security Cards in Virginia

    Available to People through a mySocial Security Account

    The Social Security Administration introduced the expansion of online services for residents of Virginiaavailable through its my Social Security portal at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount. Nancy A. Berryhill, Acting Commissioner of Social Security, announced that residents of Virginia can use the portal for many replacement Social Security number (SSN) card requests. This will allow people to replace their SSN card from the comfort of their home or office, without the need to travel to a Social Security office.

    “I’m pleased to offer the residents of Virginia the added convenience of replacing a Social Security card through the my Social Security portal,” Acting Commissioner Berryhill said. “We will continue to work on innovative initiatives to provide people with safe, secure and convenient options for doing business with us online or in person.”

    The agency is conducting a gradual roll out of this service; Virginia is one of the states, plus the District of Columbia, where this option is available. Throughout 2017, the agency will continue to expand the service option to other states. This service will mean shorter wait times for the public in the more than 1,200 Social Security offices across the country and allows staff more time to work with customers who have extensive service needs.

    U.S. citizens age 18 or older and who are residents of Virginia can request a replacement SSN card online by creating a my Social Security account. In addition, they must have a U.S. domestic mailing address, not require a change to their record (such as a name change), and have a valid driver’s license, or state identification card in some participating states.

    mySocial Securityis a secure online hub for doing business with Social Security, and more than 31 million people have created an account. In addition to Virginia residents replacing their SSN card through the portal, current Social Security beneficiaries can manage their account—change an address, adjust direct deposit, obtain a benefit verification letter, or request a replacement SSA-1099. Medicare beneficiaries can request a replacement Medicare card without waiting for a replacement form in the mail. Account holders still in the workforce can verify their earnings history and obtain estimates of future benefits by looking at their Social Security Statement online.

    For more information about this new online service, visitwww.socialsecurity.gov/ssnumber.

  10. Mrs. Annie Mae Turner

    Mrs. Annie Mae Turner, 94, of Emporia, Virginia, passed away on August 24, 2017, at the Health Care Center Lucy Corr Village in Chesterfield, VA.  The place where Mrs. Turner made her home, Sunny Side Community on Horton Road, in Greensville County.  She was preceded in death by her husband, Amos Harold Turner, to whom she was married for over 60 years.

    Mrs. Turner was a GOD fearing woman, faithful servant of the Lord, and the Mother-of-the-Church at Royal Baptist where she served many years at an usher and missionary member until her health failed and even then she showed her love for the Church by attending whenever she could.  She worked hard all of her life and cared deeply for her family by always putting them first.  Mrs.

    Turner retired from the Emporia Garment Factory and never missed a beat.

    Mrs. Turner is survived by seven children; James Turner of Plainfield, New Jersey; Annie Louise Lee (Albert Deceased) of Emporia; John Turner of Plainfield, New Jersey; Betty Hunter (Douglas) of Emporia; Harold Lee

    (Vanessa) of Hopewell, Virginia; Joyce Austin (Eugene) of Chester, Virginia, and Shelia Washington of Richmond, Virginia, and a large extended family of cousins, nieces, nephews, grandchildren, great grandchildren, great-great grandchildren, and a village of community patrons.

    There will be public viewing Tuesday, August 29, 2017, 9:00 am – 6:00 pm, and a Wake Service from 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm at R.E. Pearson & Son Funeral Service, Inc., 556 Halifax Street, Emporia, Virginia 23847.  Funeral services will be Wednesday, August 30, 2017, 12 pm at Royal Baptist Church, 106 West Atlantic Street, Emporia, Virginia 23847.  Mrs. Turner will be laid to rest in the Antioch Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery on 700 Taylors Mill Road, Emporia, Virginia 23847.

    Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.pearsonandsonfuneralhome.com.

  11. Anita White Recognized for 45 Years of Service

    Anita White received recognition from the Commonwealth of Virginia for 45 years of service at Southside Virginia Community College.  She was hired in 1971 as a secretary to the faculty.  She is currently Administrative Assistant to the Director of Workforce Development and Continuing Education.  Anita lives in Lunenburg County.

  12. Celebrated Valley Proteins Fellowships Awarded

    RICHMOND – The Virginia Foundation for Community College Education is proud to introduce its seventh class of Valley Proteins Fellows.

    This year’s scholarship recipients are:

    Tewodros “Teddy” Maxson, Central Virginia
    Marie Shiraki, Dabney S. Lancaster
    Lydia Hodges, Patrick Henry
    Samantha Scott, Piedmont Virginia
    Mostafa Mohibzadh, Thomas Nelson
    Donald Cooper, J. Sargeant Reynolds
    Hope Geiger, Southwest Virginia
    Madison Goodie, Southwest Virginia
    Austin Bryant, Virginia Western
    Daniel Feher, Wytheville

    Out of the more than 242,000 people Virginia’s Community Colleges serve across the commonwealth each year, only 10 second-year students are selected for the Valley Proteins Fellows Program. The scholarship, combined with professional development, travel, and cultural opportunities has an approximate value of $15,000.

    In addition to receiving full tuition, book expenses and fees, the Fellows participate in a unique curriculum of intellectual and cultural activities. The Fellows also volunteer 80 hours of community service during the academic year to strengthen their leadership skills and develop a strong foundation for future success.

    The fellows program is made possible thanks to the generous support of Valley Proteins, Inc. The Winchester-based company has been in the rendering business for 68 years and currently operates 15 plants in eight states.

    “Valley Proteins is privileged to invest in the future of some of Virginia's most outstanding students,” said Gerald F. (J.J.) Smith, Jr., president of Valley Proteins, Inc. “Helping to remove some of the obstacles that can hinder their success is a priority for us, and it reflects our commitment and support for the community college mission overall.”

    The Virginia Foundation for Community College Education, the fundraising arm of Virginia’s Community Colleges, oversees the fellows program, which Valley Proteins has funded for seven consecutive years.

  13. Social security celebrates hispanic heritage month

    By Jackie Weisgarber

    Social Security Public Affairs Specialist in Richmond, Virginia

    We know the importance of “familia” in Hispanic culture, and we’re proud to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15 to Oct. 15) by helping build a secure future for you, your family, and your future family.

    You can learn more about how Social Security helps secure today and tomorrow for millions of families by visiting www.socialsecurity.gov/people/hispanics/.

    Hispanics make up our nation’s largest ethnic minority group with a population of 56.6 million, according to 2015 statistics from the U.S. Census Bureau. Social Security is here to help  maintain and improve our economic well-being for generations to come.

    Currently, we do this by providing retirement, disability, and other benefits to 61 million people, including nearly 3.5 million Hispanics, who have contributed to the Social Security system through their payroll taxes. Social Security also provides a safety net to the families of American workers who become unable to work due to grave impairments or have died.

    We work hard to provide enhanced customer service and to educate millions of Americans about the importance of our programs and benefits. This allows us to connect with the Hispanic community in meaningful and efficient ways.

     

    If Spanish is your primary language, you can visit www.segurosocial.gov, our Spanish-language website. It provides hundreds of pages of important information about how to get a Social Security card, plan for retirement, apply for benefits, and manage your benefits once you’re receiving them. Many of our offices have staff who speak Spanish, or you can call 1-800-772-1213 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays and select the option for Spanish.

    Nationwide, our public affairs specialists reach out to thousands of Hispanic Americans each year to raise awareness of the benefits they may qualify for and to learn the advantages of setting up a my Social Security account atwww.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.

    These specialists promote our programs at local events, health fairs, libraries, schools, and community organizations that serve the public, including the Hispanic population. Some of our bilingual staff serve as contributors to Spanish-language television, radio stations, and newspapers. They also visit embassies and consulates in the U.S. representing Latin American countries to educate diplomatic leaders and new immigrants about Social Security programs.

    Spanish-speaking individuals wishing to apply for retirement, disability, survivor, and other benefits, as well as Medicare, can now request an appointment online at www.socialsecurity.gov/applyforbenefitsfor an in-person interview or telephone claim with a representative. In many cases, you can make an appointment with a bilingual representative.

    We’re with you and your family throughout life’s journey. To learn more about Social Security programs, visit www.segurosocial.govor www.socialsecurity.gov

  14. Free CME & CEU​Conference on Vaccinations Offered on September 9 in Southern and Central Virginia

    On Saturday, September 9, a free continuing education program will be held for physicians, physician assistants, nurses and nurse practitioners about best practices and quality improvement measures regarding adolescent immunizations, with an emphasis on the HPV vaccine. Titled Vaccinating Today for More Tomorrows, this program will be held in Danville at the Institute for Advanced Learning and Research and live streamed at satellite sites in Emporia at Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center, Farmville at Centra Southside Community Hospital, Martinsville at New College Institute and Richmond at VCU Massey Cancer Center. Three physicians with expertise in vaccination will speak about effective ways to improve patients’ health outcomes and increase physician office productivity: 

    • Alix Casler, M.D., Pediatrician, Orlando Health Physician Associates, on simple, evidence-based, long-standing quality improvement measures
    • Mark Stoler, M.D., Associate Director of Surgical Pathology and Cytopathology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, on HPV and his role in HPV vaccine development
    • Pam Hull, PhD, Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, on customizable behavioral intervention tools 

    The speakers aim to make this topic easy for health care providers by providing compelling facts, tried-and-true scripts and proven tools. Among the adolescent immunizations discussed will be the HPV vaccine, an effective, safe way to reduce greatly the risk of developing cancers associated with HPV. The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common infection, infecting 80 percent of all sexually active people. Usually the immune system cleanses the body of the virus and people never knew they were infected. However, when the virus lingers, it may develop into cancer affecting both men and women. In women, HPV strains cause 91 percent of all cervical cancers, 69 percent of vulvar cancers and 75 percent of vaginal cancers, according to the CDC. The virus is also responsible for 63 percent of penile cancers in men and about 70 percent of oropharyngeal and 91 percent of anal cancers in both sexes.  

    The program is organized by the Cancer Research and Resource Center of Southern Virginia, an outreach program of VCU Massey Cancer Center with partial funding from the Tobacco Region Revitalization Commission; VCU Massey Cancer Center; and PATHS AHEC, and it is sponsored by Sovah Health - Danville. 

    The programs at all sites begin with check-in and continental breakfast at 8:00-8:30am. The program at the satellite sites will end at noon, while the host site in Danville includes lunch and roundtable discussions continuing until 1:30pm. This program has been approved by VCU Health Continuing Medical Education for a maximum of 4 CMEs at the host site in Danville and 3 CMEs at the satellite sites and by SOVA-Health for a maximum of 3.75 CEUs in Danville and 3 CEUS at the satellite sites.  

    Open to the general public, this free program requires advance registration to attend because space is limited. Registration and more information about roundtable topics and discussion leaders is available online at http://bit.ly/2uS6RCJ.  Call 434.421.3060 with any questions.

  15. SVCC Employees Recognized for 5, 10, 15 and 25 Years of Service

    Southside Virginia Community College recently recognized employees for Five Years of Service to the Commonwealth of Virginia.  Those who received the recognition are (Left to Right) Mary Downing-Garner, Christin Jackson, Anthony Taylor, Leslie Jackson and Suzanne Shook.  Those unable to attend the ceremony who also are recognized for five years of service are Katherine Irby, Diane "Dee" Pinnell, Michael Williams and Donna Worley.  

    Dr. Sarah Horne also was recognized for five years of service to the Commonwealth of Virginia.

    Southside Virginia Community  College recently recognized employees who had Ten Years of Service to the Commonwealth of Virginia. They are (Left to Right) David Canning, Leslie Cline, Marika Peterson and Sally Tharrington.  Those unable to attend the ceremony who are also Ten Year recipients are Lois Hicks, Emily Noblin, Kathy Pegram, and Melissa Wood.

    Southside Virginia Community College recently recognized employees with 15 Years of Service to the Commonwealth of Virginia.  they are (Left to Right) Leigh Moore and Misty Smiley.  Not pictured is recipient Detra Carr.  

     

    Southside Virginia Community College recently recognized employees for 25 Years of Service to the Commonwealth of Virginia.  They are (Left to Right) Dennis Smith and Brenda Elder.  

  16. Pauline “Polly” Harris Vincent

    Pauline “Polly” Harris Vincent, 82, of Emporia, went Home Wednesday, August 23, 2017. She is survived by her husband, Robert Elwood Vincent; two sons, Robie L. Vincent and wife, Brenda and Timothy E. Vincent; three granddaughters, Rebecca V. Merritt and husband, Tyler, Katherine V. Green and husband, Troy and Brittany V. Aerni and husband, Adam; two great-grandchildren, Caroline Green and Connor Merritt and a sister, Cecelia H. Whitehead and husband, Thomas. The family will receive friends 12:30 – 2 p.m. Saturday, August 26 at Fountain Creek Baptist Church where the funeral service will be held at 2 p.m. Interment will follow at Forest Hill Baptist Church Cemetery. Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com

  17. NC Fugitives Apprehended in Minnesota; Search for Missing N.C. Man Continues

    NELSON COUNTY, Va. - The two fugitives from North Carolina being sought in a Nelson County shooting are now in police custody. Shortly after 9 a.m. Eastern Standard Time, Sean D. Castorina and Penny M. Dawson were apprehended by the Fergus Falls, Minn., Police Department. The two were arrested without incident at a gas station within that jurisdiction.

    The two will be extradited back to Virginia to face charges of malicious wounding, use of a firearm and grand larceny of a vehicle.

    During the past two days, the Virginia State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigation’s Appomattox Field Office, the Nelson County, Va., Sheriff’s Office, Burlington, N.C., Police Department and the U.S. Marshals Service have been actively pursuing leads and searching for the couple.

    The incident began Aug. 19, 2017, when the Burlington, N.C. Police Department received a report of a missing person. Mr. Harold Dean Simpson, 84, was last seen by his family at 10:30 a.m., on Friday, Aug. 18, 2017. Mr. Simpson’s silver 2007 Chevrolet Cobalt was located by the Nelson County Sheriff’s Office at 6:48 p.m., on Monday, Aug. 21. The vehicle, with North Carolina license plate EMA 8936, had been abandoned on Laurel Road in eastern Nelson County.

    During the course of the investigation into the abandoned vehicle, the Nelson County Sheriff’s Office received a 911 call at approximately 7:30 p.m., Tuesday (Aug. 22) about a shooting victim at a residence on Laurel Road near Rockfish River. When law enforcement arrived on scene, they found a 60-year-old female suffering from a gunshot wound. She continues to be treated at UVA Hospital in Charlottesville, Va., for serious injuries.

    After the shooting, Castorina and Dawson fled the residence in a 2002 Dodge Dakota that belonged to the owner of the residence. The two were still driving the stolen pickup truck when apprehended in Minnesota.

    The search continues for Mr. Simpson. Anyone with information related to Mr. Simpson’s disappearance is asked to still please contact the Burlington, N.C., Police or call 911 or, in Virginia, call #77 on a cell phone.

  18. Gloria Mae White Smith

    Gloria Mae White Smith, 86 of Emporia, Va., passed away August 22, 2017, at Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center in Emporia, Va.

    She was born May 28, 1931 in Mobjack, Va., to the late Luther Clyde White and Lola Brooks White. She was preceded in death by her husband, David Walter Murden Smith, her sister Juanita White Johnson, and one step-great grandchild, Geneva Ward.

    Gloria is survived by her two sons, David Wayne Smith and wife Bertelle Pugh Smith of Wendell, N.C., and Colonel (retired) Stephen Clyde Smith of Huntsville, Al. She is also survived by two grandchildren, Emily Ann Smith and Ryan James Smith; four step-grandchildren, Curtis Forrest, Cindy Price, Bonnie Bruno, and Joe Forrest; and four step great-grandchildren, William Ward, Hillary Forrest, Jennie Forrest, and Isabella Bruno.

    Gloria graduated from Mathews High School in 1949. She married her husband David in 1953 and was married for 54 years. During their marriage David and Gloria lived in Mathews, Va., Lively, Va., Miskimon, Va., and finally, Emporia, Va.

    The family would like to thank all of Gloria’s friends in Emporia, Va. but in particular her close friend Ms. Shirley Temple for her dedication throughout Gloria’s bout with cancer. The family would also like to thank the personnel at Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center, Greensville Health and Rehabilitation Center, and the Bloom Center.

    The family will receive visitors from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. on Thursday August 24, 2017 at Echols Funeral Home in Emporia, Va. Funeral services will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday August 26, 2017, at Foster-Faulkner Funeral Home in Mathews, Va. The family will also receive visitors prior to the service from 10:00-11:00. Interment will follow at Old Field Point Cemetery in Moon, Va.

  19. SEARCH CONTINUES FOR MISSING NORTH CAROLINA MAN & FUGITIVE COUPLE

         

    Click on photos for larger version

    NELSON CO., Va. – Virginia State Police and the Nelson County Sheriff’s Office, in conjunction with the Burlington, N.C. Police Department, is still actively searching for the missing 84-year-old man from Burlington, N.C., and the two North Carolina fugitives.

    The incident began August 19, 2017, when the Burlington, N.C. Police Department received a report of a missing person. Mr. Harold Dean Simpson, 84, was last seen by his family at 10:30 a.m., on Friday, August 18, 2017. According to the Burlington, N.C. Police Department’s press release, “Mr. Simpson has no history of dementia or other cognitive impairments.”

    Mr. Simpson’s silver 2007 Chevrolet Cobalt was located by the Nelson County Sheriff’s Office at 6:48 p.m., on Monday, Aug. 20. The vehicle, with North Carolina license plate EMA 8936, had been abandoned on Laurel Road in eastern Nelson County.

    During the course of the investigation into the abandoned vehicle, the Nelson County Sheriff’s Office received a 911 call at approximately 7:30 p.m., Tuesday (Aug. 22) about a shooting victim at a residence on Laurel Road near Rockfish River. When law enforcement arrived on scene, they found a 60-year-old female suffering from a gunshot wound. She continues to be treated at UVA Hospital in Charlottesville, Va., for serious injuries.

    Missing from the same residence is a white 2002 Dodge Dakota with a medium-blue tailgate and custom, faded-red, squared-off bumper. The pickup truck has a North Carolina license plate, DHN 5418, affixed to the bumper.

    Based on the investigation into the shooting, Virginia State Police obtained arrest warrants for malicious wounding and use of a firearm for both Sean D. Castorina, 42, of Burlington, N.C., and Penny M. Dawson, 40, of Burlington, N.C.

    Castorina is a white male with distinctive tattoos on his forearms. He is approximately 5 feet 8 inches tall and weighs approximately 150 lbs. (See photos in previous story here)

    Dawson is a white female, 5 feet 3 inches in height and weighs approximately 172 pounds.

    The Nelson County Sheriff’s Office and Virginia State Police are actively searching for Castorina and Dawson. Castorina does have family in Norfolk, Va.

    Both are considered armed and dangerous, and should not be approached. Anyone with information about Castorina and/or Dawson and/or the missing pickup truck is encouraged to call 911 or #77 on a cell phone. 

  20. Local & State Police Searching for Two NC Subjects

         

    In the late hours of 8/21/2017 the Nelson County Sheriff’s Office responded to an unoccupied suspicious vehicle in the Laurel Road area of Nelson County. The vehicle is registered to an elderly man listed as missing from North Carolina.

    Please be on the lookout for Sean Damion Castorina WM- 06/04/1975 and Penny Michelle Dawson WF- 03/07/1977 of Burington, NC. They are wanted for questioning in the suspicious disappearance of an elderly white male from Burlington. There are no active warrants on either subject at this time. Mr. Castorina was last believed to be in Virginia and has family in Norfolk, VA.

    As of 7:36 p.m., Tuesday (8/22/17) the Nelson County Sheriff’s and Virginia State police responded to a shooting at the 3000 block of Laurel Rd. This is currently an active crime scene. We are asking all citizens in Nelson County to shelter in place until further notice.

    We are currently looking for a person of interest driving a white 2002 Dodge Dakota with a blue tailgate. North Carolina tag DHN-5418

    If located contact police immediately, do not attempt to approach, may be armed and dangerous. Call 911 or #77 on a cell phone if you have any information about either subject.

  21. BA Welcomes New Faculty

    New teachers join the Brunswick Academy Faculty this year. Front row (l to r) - Sharon O'Berry-2nd Grade, Tracy Frye-First Aid, Health, Driver's Ed, LS P.E., Nevine Powell-MS Science, Karolyn Hawthorne-Spanish. Back row (l to r) - Kendele Reamey-MS English, Sarah Moore-1st Grade, Tommy King-MS Social Studies/History, Cheryl Freeman-4th Grade, Sharon Propst-HS English.

    Brunswick Academy also welcomes new staff member, Mrs. Brittney Weidman.  Mrs. Weidman is the new Director of Upper School and Student Activities.  

  22. Accommodating Students with Differences

    By Dr. Al Roberts

    Many left-handed people observe International Lefthanders Day annually during the month of August. The focus helps raise awareness about the inconveniences and frustrations left-handed people face in a world built for right-handed people.

    I am right-handed. Most people are—nearly 90% according to some studies. As a right-handed person, I have never had to cope with scissors that failed to cut because of my grip. When I use a ruler to draw a straight a line, my hand does not obscure the numbers measuring its length. Every time I write in a spiral-bound notebook, use a hand-operated can opener, or peel potatoes, I take advantage of the fact product designers work most frequently with people of my handedness in mind.

    Historically, left-handedness carried a stigma. Although this is no longer the case, at least in most of the United States and other places where Western cultural patterns prevail, the English language retains remnants of past prejudices. For example, the word “sinister” means evil, malicious, or devious. The word comes from the Latin sinister, meaning left or left-handed. On the other hand, literally, the Latin opposite, dexter, for right-handed, shows up in English words such as “dexterity” (skill, agility, or nimbleness). A person with “two left feet” is awkward or clumsy, but a “right-hand” man or woman is a reliable helper.

    Although contemporary culture no longer views left-handedness as a disability, left-handed students often benefit from using appropriate tools in order to accomplish learning tasks efficiently. Sometimes, these accommodations involve simple items, such as left-handed scissors or notebooks, but accommodations can also extend to complex issues, such as desk design and the ergonomics of computer stations.

    In a similar way, students experiencing other needs can benefit from various modifications in the learning environment. Some students struggle and require accommodations because of physical or learning disabilities. Others have chronic health concerns or other challenges.  At Southside Virginia Community College, our mission involves making sure every student has access to an education, and

    SVCC’s commitment to equal educational opportunities includes providing reasonable accommodations to students with documented disabilities. Examples of accommodations include preferential seating, note-taking assistance, copies of instructor’s notes, Braille books, adaptive software, private testing rooms or extended time on tests, and oral test administration.

    Students with disabilities or chronic health problems are encouraged to identify themselves to a Disability Services Counselor to establish eligibility and to coordinate reasonable accommodations. Students with physical access concerns can also learn about campus parking, wheelchair access availability, and evacuation plans.

    Disabilities Services maintains confidential contacts and records. Disability is never indicated on college student records. For more information about accommodations, contact SVCC’s Director of Counseling at 434-949-1063.

    Dr. Al Roberts is president of Southside Virginia Community College, an institution of higher learning that provides a wide variety of education opportunities to a diverse student population within a service area that spans ten counties and the city of Emporia. He can be reached via email at al.roberts@southside.edu.

  23. James Allen Peden, Jr,

    James Allen Peden, Jr, 19, of Boykins, passed away suddenly on August 20, 2017. He was preceded in death by his paternal grandparents, Archie and Annie Peden and maternal grandfather, Waverly Porch.

    James Allen is survived by his parents, James and Sandy Peden; brothers, Jeffrey and Jacob Peden; grandparents, James Thomas “Gomer” and Betty Cooke; uncles and aunts, W.J. and Amy Porch, James Thomas and Mandy Cooke, John and Julie Peden, Amelia Covington and a large extended family of cousins, great aunts and great uncles.

    The family will receive friends at the home of his grandparents, Gomer and Betty Cooke. The funeral service will be held graveside 2 p.m. Sunday, August 27 at Beechwood Cemetery, Boykins, Virginia. In lieu of flowers, the family suggest memorial contributions be made to Boykins Volunteer Fire Department. Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com

  24. Lois Cohen Bloom

    Lois Cohen Bloom, 78, of Boynton Beach, Fla., passed away after a short illness surrounded by her family, on August 20, 2017. Lois was born in Richmond, Va. to the late Jesse and Esta Cohen. She graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School in Richmond, Va. and moved to Emporia, Va. after getting married to Richard Bloom on November 18, 1961. A long-time resident of Emporia, Va., Lois also resided over the years in Las Vegas, Nev., Virginia Beach, Va. and most recently in Palm Beach, Fla. She was a great wife to Richard and loving mother to her three children and grandmother to four grandchildren. Lois is survived by her loving husband of 56 years, Richard, son Charles Bloom (Cindy and grandchildren Lindsey and Maxwell Bloom) of Blythewood, S.C.; daughter Sari Bloom of Lake Worth, Fla.; son Jared Bloom (Sandy and grandchildren Jordan and Maddux Bloom) of Longwood, Fla; and special friend Jeannie Blazevige-Horn of West Palm Beach, Fla. She was predeceased by her sister, Betty Ann Pinchefsky of Locust Hill, Va. The family thanks everyone for their thoughts and prayers. In lieu of flowers, the family is requesting donations sent to the Hospice of Palm Beach County Foundation (hpbcf.org). A family-only celebration of her life will be scheduled at a later date.

  25. Nursing is Here!

    Ivory Richardson never imagined himself as an OR nurse, but in just a few months he’ll be completing his 10th year at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital in South Hill, Virginia. Forget what you thought you knew about the way nursing should look because Ivory has been breaking the mold since day one. A member of the Haliwa-Saponi Indian Tribe, one of the largest Native American Indian tribes in North Carolina, he was born and raised in Hollister, NC. Although his community was severely impoverished, Ivory was determined to succeed.

    Before pursuing nursing, Ivory worked for the  volunteer fire department and full time as a transport medic for EMS. After attending UNC Chapel Hill, Ivory made the decision to continue his education closer to home. His extensive EMT experience helped him get into the RN program at a local community college. He accepted a position at CMH in the ER, before eventually finding his home in the OR, where he fills multiple roles, both as a scrub and circulating nurse.

    For Ivory, seeing patients again or out in the community and having them remember the good care that he gave them is incredibly rewarding. “I love taking care of patients,” he says.

    He also values the flexibility that his career in nursing has given him, as well as his wife who also works at CMH as an X-ray sonographer and nuclear medicine technologist, a highly-specialized field in and of itself.

    “The nursing profession has given both me and my wife incredible flexibility over the years,” says Ivory. “There are so many different fields and areas you can go into that you can truly find something that fits you and your needs.”

    “One of the best parts about being an OR nurse is that the schedule is planned ahead and apart from emergency procedures. We don’t work most weekends,” Ivory adds.

    Ivory is aware that being a male nurse shatters a few stereotypes but he’s proud of the level of care that he provides his patients.

    For more nursing information, visit www.nursingishere.com

  26. Betty D. Norman

    Betty D. Norman, 77, of Jarratt, passed away Saturday, August 19, 2017. She was preceded in death by her husband, Edward C. Norman and a daughter, Renee’ N. Swiger. Mrs. Norman is survived by a son, Edward L. Norman and wife, Angela of Chester; daughter, Lesha L. Booden of Jarratt; three grandchildren, Amanda Stepp and husband, Andrew, Tommy Norman and Carly Norman; great-grandson, Mattox; a brother, Roger Dowdy and wife, Judy of Christiansburg, VA; two sisters, Linda Wallace of CT and Susan Martin and husband, Danny of Woolwine, VA and a number of nieces and nephews. Mrs. Norman was retired from the Norfolk Police Department. She had a talent for embroidery, stitching, and enjoyed fashioning crafts.

    Her family trusts that Mom is on her next journey, with God, and envisions her picking flowers, one of her great joys in this life.

    A private memorial service will be scheduled at a later date. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made to the American Diabetes Association. 

  27. Lawrence Olson Carter

    Lawrence Olson Carter, 90, AKA Mr. Camp Kehukee, of Stony Creek, Virginia entered eternal rest  in the House of The Lord  to join his beloved wife, Mae on Saturday, August 19, 2017. He was the son of the late Lloyd and Fannie Carter and was also preceded in death by two brothers, L. J. Carter and Homer W. Carter; five sisters, Emily Howard, Evelyn Modlin, Jean Worrell, Barbara Harrell and Marjorie Burgess.

    Mr. Carter is survived by a daughter, Carolyn Gregory-Adams and devoted friend, J. N. Gibbs, Jr. of Dolphin, Virginia; son, L. Chester Carter and devoted friend, Joyce Williams, both of Stony Creek; three loving and beautiful granddaughters, Ashley Stainback and husband, Ryan and their daughter, Lillie Mae  all of Stony Creek; Crystal Carter of Newport News and their mother Sylvia B. Carter of Stony Creek who was a devoted daughter -in-law for many years and Sammantha Thomas and husband, Dustin and their son, Easton Cole of Jackson, NC; a sister, Juliette Moore of Richmond; sister-in-law, Mary Reed of Churchville, Virginia; three brothers-in-law, Eddie Jarratt of Salem, Virginia, Henry Jarratt of Stuart, Virginia and W. C. Burgess who was especially devoted to Lawrence;  and a number of nieces and nephews; also devoted friend and caretaker, Keith Urquart; and caretaker Taylor Williams and special friend to the family Gerald (Juicy) Taylor.

    Mr. Carter was a retired farmer and builder and a lifelong Deacon at Readville Baptist Church and along with his wife, Mae worked diligently to build and maintain Camp Kehukee with the Petersburg Baptist Association. His remains will lie in state Wednesday, August 23 at Camp Kehukee 17414 Shands Rd., Petersburg, Virginia where the family will receive friends 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m and where the funeral service will be held at 1 p.m. Interment will follow at Readville Baptist Church Cemetery, Sussex, Virginia. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made to Readville Baptist Church Building Fund or to Camp Kehukee in memory of Lawrence and Mae Carter, c/o Petersburg Baptist Association, P.O. Box 3117, Petersburg, Virginia 23805.

  28. Louise Robinette Selfe

    Louise Robinette Selfe, age 101, of Skippers, VA passed away August 20, 2017.  She is preceded in death by her parents, Millard and Martha Robinette; her husband, Jasper Alderson Selfe; her brother, Richard Robinette; and her sister Alice Rezeau.  She is survived by her daughter, Martha Selfe Hughes; her grandchildren, Judy Edwards, Michael Robert Hughes and Danielle Hughes Dillow; two great grandchildren, Jennifer Edwards and Brandon Hughes; one great great granddaughter, Riley Dillow; and her brother, Millard R. Robinette.  Williams Funeral Home, Lawrenceville will be handling the arrangements.  

  29. Richardson Memorial Library Summer Reading Winners

    The Meherrin Regional Library's 2017 Summer Reading Program, Reading by Design, has come to a close! Children were challenged to meet reading goals of 20 (Bronze level), 35 (Silver level), and 50 books (Gold level) over the summer. Teens were challenged to read 10 chapter books. Participants who reached the Bronze level were entered into a drawing to win a tablet at the Grand Finale on August 3rd. The tablet winner at Richardson Memorial Library was Liam Kelley. 

    Gold Medal winners at Richardson Memorial Library were Jashanti Valentine, Savannah Taylor, Taraji Adams, Cadence Taylor, Katie Gordon, Kevin Gordon, and Haley Prince, pictured with Director Becky Walker. Not pictured are Jacqueline Grubb, Joceline Grubb, Jasmine Grubb, Abby Hancock, McKenzey Dickens, Sam Dickens, Blair Dickens, and Kensley Roach.

  30. Southside Virginia Community College has been named a “2017 Great College to Work For”

    SVCC is a great college to work for, according to a new survey by The Chronicle of Higher Education, a top trade publication for colleges and universities.

    The results, released July 17, 2017 in The Chronicle’s tenth annual report on The Academic Workplace, are based on a survey of 232 colleges and universities.

    Only 79 of the institutions that applied for the program achieved “Great College to Work For” recognition. Results are reported for small, medium, and large institutions, with SVCC included among the 22 two year institutions that made the cut.

    SVCC won honors in two categories this year which are Facilities, Workspaces and Security and Work/Life Balance.

    "The legacy of Southside Virginia Community College as a great place to work continues.    Once again, we have gained this designation by fostering a college culture that promotes a phenomenal work/life balance and provides a safe, secure and comfortable environment.   We invest in our human resources and encourage inclusive and transparent communication; promote and value diversity; and support innovation," said Dr. Al Roberts, SVCC President.

    “Ten years in, the Great Colleges to Work For distinction is well-known by academic jobseekers as a sign that an institution’s employees are valued and given opportunities for growth even when they face financial constraints,” said Liz McMillen, editor of The Chronicle. “Any college or university that’s on the list is showing that they emphasize one of their most valuable assets: their faculty and staff.”

    The survey results are based on a two-part assessment process: an institutional audit that captured demographics and workplace policies, and a survey administered to faculty, administrators, and professional support staff. The primary factor in deciding whether an institution received recognition was the employee feedback.

    To administer the survey and analyze the results, The Chronicle worked with ModernThink LLC, a strategic human capital consulting firm that has conducted numerous “Best Places to Work” programs, surveying hundreds of thousands of employees nationwide.

    “It’s easier to be a great workplace during good times, but it’s when times are tough that the

    commitment to workplace quality really gets tested,” said Richard K. Boyer, principal and managing partner, ModernThink LLC. “And those institutions that measure up during times of economic hardship reinforce their already strong cultures and put even more distance between them and their peer institutions for whom they compete for talent.”

  31. 2017 BA Senior-First Grade March

    Brunswick Academy held one of its oldest traditions on Wednesday, August 16, 2017, the Senior-First Grade March.  The Class of 2018 introduced the Class of 2029.  This tradition builds new friendships and is always one of the favorite days of the year!  

  32. Colonial Heights Rotary Collect School Supplies & Host an Ice Cream Social for Children at Jackson-Feild

    Over the course of several weeks, the Colonial Heights Rotary Club held a drive to collect school supplies for the children at Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services. OI August 10, club members traveled to the campus to present the supplies to the children at an ice cream social.  The residents thanked the members for the supplies but were more interested in the ice cream, with toppings, severed on a hot summer evening.

    The Colonial Heights Rotary Club has been a loyal friend to the children at Jackson-Feild. They regularly conduct drives for needed items, lend a helping hand for volunteer projects and hosted events for the pleasure of residents.

    Club president Debbie Wall and the members have enjoyed interacting with the residents. Jackson-Feild is a behavior health organization serving children with severe mental health disorders.

  33. Isaiah Stephens Competes at Junior Olympics

    Lazers Track Club member and rising 8th grader at E. W. Wyatt, Isaiah Stephens competed in the 2017 AAU National Jr. Olympics at Eastern Michigan University in Detroit, MI.  Stephens competed in the javelin, shot put and discus events.  He is ranked #10 in the javelin, 16th in the shot put and 16th in the discus in the United States.  Stephens also still holds his rank of #1 in the state of Virginia for javelin, shot put and discus.

    Stephens and his mother, La-Tina Smith would like to thank his Coach, Les Young and his sister, Laricesa Miles (former athlete of Coach Young) for their time and dedication in training him.  They would also like a special thanks to family members, neighbors, Sadler Brothers Oil, Juanita Brown & family, Joann Christina, Ava Young, Christine Johnson, Chaka Newell, Andree Lee, Ruby Allen and Lawrenceville Correctional Center for their support. 

    Stephens says that he will continuously thank God for his talent because without God, he knows none of this would be possible.

    The 2018 USATF National Jr. Olympics will be held in Greensboro, NC and AAU National will be held in Des Moines, IA. See you next year!

  34. Information for Monday's Solar Eclipse

    According to the interactive map supplied by NASA, the Partial Eclipse in Emporia will begin at 1:18 pm and end at 4:05 pm. Maximum Obscuration will be at 2:45 pm. While we are not in the path of totality, we should see 88.4% of the sun obscured by the moon.

    Safety Information

    Looking directly at the Sun is unsafe except during the brief total phase of a solar eclipse (totality), when the Moon entirely blocks the Sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totality.

    The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the Sun. To date four manufacturers have certified that their eclipse glasses and handheld solar viewers meet the ISO 12312-2 international standard for such products: Rainbow Symphony, American Paper Optics, Thousand Oaks Optical, and TSE 17.

    Always inspect your solar filter before use; if scratched or damaged, discard it. Read and follow any instructions printed on or packaged with the filter. Always supervise children using solar filters.

    • Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright Sun. After glancing at the Sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the Sun.
    • Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device. Similarly, do not look at the Sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury. Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device.
    • If you are within the path of totality, remove your solar filter only when the Moon completely covers the Sun’s bright face and it suddenly gets quite dark. Experience totality, then, as soon as the bright Sun begins to reappear, replace your solar viewer to glance at the remaining partial phases.

    An alternative method for safe viewing of the partially eclipsed Sun is pinhole projection. For example, cross the outstretched, slightly open fingers of one hand over the outstretched, slightly open fingers of the other. With your back to the Sun, look at your hands’ shadow on the ground. The little spaces between your fingers will project a grid of small images on the ground, showing the Sun as a crescent during the partial phases of the eclipse.

    A solar eclipse is one of nature’s grandest spectacles. By following these simple rules, you can safely enjoy the view and be rewarded with memories to last a lifetime.

    Safety information courtesy of NASA

  35. Tony Darrell Moseley

    Tony Darrell Moseley, age 54, of Emporia, VA passed away August 16, 2017.  He is preceded in death by his father, Frank Willard Moseley.  He is survived by his wife, Melinda Lewis Moseley; his daughter, Shannon Gibbs and husband Brandon; his grandchildren, Aaron and Addison Gibbs; his mother, Sandra Wrenn Edwards; his brothers, Troy L. Moseley and Cathy Baird and Randy Moseley and wife Jeanne; and numerous nieces and nephews.  A graveside service will be conducted 2:00 p.m. Friday at Greensville Memorial Cemetery, Emporia, VA.  The family will receive friends Thursday from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at Williams Funeral Home, Lawrenceville.  In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to chordomafoundation.org.

  36. FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS FINALIZED FOR VIRGINIA STATE POLICE PILOTS

    RICHMOND, Va. – Funeral arrangements have been finalized for Virginia State Police Lieutenant H. Jay Cullen and Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates, who died in a helicopter crash in Albemarle County on the afternoon of August 12, 2017:

    TROOPER-PILOT BERKE M.M. BATES

    Visitation:Thursday, August 17, 2017

    1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

    Nelson Funeral Home at 4650 South Laburnum Avenue, Richmond, VA 23231

    Funeral:Friday, August 18, 2017

    11:00 a.m.

    Saint Paul’s Baptist Church at 4247 Creighton Road, Richmond, VA 23223

    The interment will be a private graveside service.

    LIEUTENANT H. JAY CULLEN

    Visitation:Friday, August 18, 2017

    5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. 

    Bennett Funeral Home at 14301 Ashbrook Parkway, Chesterfield, VA 23832

    Funeral:Saturday, August 19, 2017

    10:00 a.m.

    Southside Church of the Nazarene at 6851 Courthouse Road, Chesterfield, VA 23832

    The interment will be a private graveside service.

    For those wishing to support the Cullen and/or Bates families financially, contributions are being accepted through the Virginia State Police Association (VSPA) (www.vspa.org) Emergency Relief Fund (ERF). Monetary donations can be made by check (made payable to VSPA-ERF with “Jay Cullen” and/or “Berke Bates” noted in the memo) or Citizens may also donate through PayPal by visiting  http://vspa.org/initiatives/emergency-relief-fund.  When donating through PayPal please be sure to note the donation is for "Lt. Cullen and/or Tpr. Bates" in the comment section. Checks can be mailed to the VSPA ERF at 6944 Forest Hill Avenue, Richmond, VA 23225. All donations to the VSPA-ERF are tax deductible, and 100% of the donation goes to the families. For any additional questions, please contact the VSPA at 804-320-6272.

  37. VIRGINIA STATE POLICE MOURNS DEATH OF TWO PILOTS

    RICHMOND, Va. – The Virginia State Police is mourning the loss of its 64th and 65th members to die in the line of duty since 1932. Lieutenant H. Jay Cullen, 48, and Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates, 40, died last Saturday (Aug. 12, 2017) when the helicopter they were piloting crashed in Albemarle County. Funeral arrangements for both are still pending at this time.

    Lieutenant H. Jay Cullen (1969 – 2017)

    Lieutenant Cullen was born in Winchester County, N.Y., and graduated from Germantown High School in Memphis, Tenn., in 1987. Prior to joining the Virginia State Police in 1993, he worked as a flight instructor in Front Royal, Va. and Winchester, Va. He held a bachelor’s degree from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

    He graduated from the Virginia State Police Training Academy as a member of the 90th Basic Session on May 13, 1994. His first patrol assignment upon graduation was in Virginia State Police Fairfax Division’s Area 9 Office in Fairfax. In 1999, he joined the Aviation Unit as a Trooper-Pilot at the Virginia State Police Aviation Base in Manassas and has been assigned to Aviation Unit ever since.

    The following year he was transferred to the Lynchburg Aviation Base, where in 2003 he achieved the rank of Senior Trooper. He was promoted to the rank of Sergeant in 2005 and assumed his new role at the Virginia State Police Aviation Base in Chesterfield County.

    In 2007, he was named acting First Sergeant at the Chesterfield base. He was promoted to the rank of First Sergeant in 2012 and then became acting Lieutenant at the base that December.

    He is a 2014 graduate of the National Criminal Justice Command College at the University of Virginia. In February 2017, he attained the rank of Lieutenant and became commander of the Aviation Unit. 

    Lt. Cullen is survived by his wife and two sons, ages 17 and 15.

    Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates (1976 – 2017)    

    Trooper-Pilot Bates was born in Manassas, Va. and graduated from Brentsville District Middle-Senior High School in Nokesville, Va. in 1994. He served as a Trooper with the Florida Highway Patrol from 1998 until he joined the Virginia State Police in 2004. He graduated from the Virginia State Police Academy on August 27, 2004 as a member of the 107th Basic Session.

    His first assignment was in Virginia State Police Richmond Division’s Area 8 Office, which encompasses the City of Richmond and Henrico County. Less than a year later he became a member of the office’s Motors Unit, serving as a motorcycle trooper until 2013. He joined the Governor’s protection detail, known as the State Police Executive Protective Unit, in October 2013 and served with the unit for three years before accepting promotion to Special Agent with the Virginia State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigation’s Richmond Field Office General Investigations Section. In July 2017, he became a Trooper-Pilot with the Virginia State Police Aviation Unit.

    Trooper Bates is survived by his wife and twin 12-year-old son and daughter.

    Fatal Helicopter Crash in Albemarle County

    At 4:51 p.m. on Saturday (Aug. 12, 2017), a Virginia State Police Bell 407 helicopter crashed into a wooded area near a residence on Old Farm Road in Albemarle County.  The helicopter was assisting public safety resources with the ongoing situation in Charlottesville.

    The pilot, Lt. Cullen of Midlothian, Va., and Trooper-Pilot Bates of Quinton, Va., died at the scene.

    The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and the state police are investigating the cause of the fatal helicopter crash in Albemarle County. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is also investigating the incident.

  38. August 2017 Truck Driving Graduates

    Graduates of the Southside Virginia Community College(SVCC)Truck Driver Training Program held in Emporia are shown with others attending the ceremony.   They are (Left to Right) Dr.  Rene Felts,  VP Workforce Paul D Camp Community College (PDCCC), Dennis Seay Instructor, Doug Kemerer Instructor, Allen Boyd ATA Road Team Captin (Guest Speaker), James Cook of South Hill, Nathan Kraemer of Chesapeake, James Banty of Stony Creek, Michael Prince of Emporia, and Kent Montgomery of Petersburg,  Clyde Rothgeb Instructor, Duncan Quicke, Coordinator of TDTS, Dr. Daniel Lufkin (President PDCCC) and Dr. Al Roberts, President of SVCC

  39. SVCC Welding Program Graduates First Class

    Proud graduates of the first Welding Skills Certification Program which was taught at Southside Virginia Education Center of Southside Virginia Community College, Greensville County, Virginia.  The welding laboratory was spearheaded by Fluor, a company that came to Southside Virginia to build two colossal power stations for Dominion Energy.  

    Other partners in the creation of the lab are Virginia Tobacco Commission, Dominion Energy, Greensville County and American Equipment Company (Ameco).  The graduates receive three NCCER Credentials as well as an OSHA 10 Credential in this fast track, 11-week training program.  Graduates are (Front Row, Left to Right)Herbert Ruffin of Lawrenceville, Antonio Stewart of Dolphin, Alexia Gary of Emporia, Starr Barnes of Lawrenceville, Paulus Brown of Emporia and (Back Row, L to R) Damienne Drumgold of Lawrenceville,  Bernard Parham, Jr., of Lawrenceville, Isiah Johnson of Emporia, and Dr. Marcus Bridges, Instructor.

    Another class begins in September.  Call 434 634 9358 for information.

  40. VSU To Host Public Field Day On Industrial Hemp on Thursday, August 17

    Industrial hemp, a crop with a long and storied history in Virginia, is the subject of an August 17 public field day at Virginia State University (VSU). This first-of-its kind event will provide a forum for potential producers, researchers, marketing experts and processing industry professionals to discuss the production and economic potential of this crop. The discussions will be useful to Virginia farmers who may decide to grow industrial hemp if legislation changes to make it legal again to do so.

    In 2015, Virginia lawmakers authorized the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) to enter into a memorandum of understanding with universities within the commonwealth to grow industrial hemp for research purposes. As a result, Virginia State University, Virginia Tech and James Madison University are currently conducting industrial hemp research that will position the state to provide the necessary information farmers will need to successfully grow the crop should it once again be legalized.

    Meanwhile, the popularity of industrial hemp-made products soars. Currently all industrial hemp products sold in the U.S., including food, personal care products, clothing and even construction materials, are imported to the U.S. from Canada, China, Europe and other countries where the crop is legal.

    Industrial hemp (Cannnabis sativa L.) is botanically related to marijuana, but with very different properties. While marijuana is rich with tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component that makes pot a drug of choice by many, hemp contains only the smallest traces of THC (<0.3%), making it virtually impossible to get high from. But it does produce strong fibers, and the seed has good quality oil that once made it a cash crop for America.

    Fiber-type varieties are used mainly for production of fiber that has multiple applications in the textile industry for yarns and fabrics, sail ropes and canvas. The remaining plant parts are used for industrial applications including paper, building material reinforcement, insulation material, bio-energy and more. Hemp seed is also valuable. It contains high quality oil currently used in the food, pharmaceutical, medical and cosmetic industries. The seed has a high protein content with a balanced amino acid profile and is used in human dietary supplements. Left-over cake material from oil extraction is a rich protein source used as an animal food supplement.

    In fact, hemp fiber was so important to our young nation that colonial farmers were often mandated to grow it. The Declaration of Independence is said to have been drafted on hemp paper, and our nation’s victory in the American Revolution can in many ways be attributed to the patriots’ use of hemp in making their ships’ sails, rope, riggings and more. George Washington grew it, and Thomas Jefferson bred improved hemp varieties. Abraham Lincoln also used hemp seed oil to fuel his household lamps. During World War II, the USDA developed a “Hemp for Victory” film to encourage everyone to grow the crop to support the war effort. The fibers were used for parachutes, rope, shoes, clothes and more.

    But during the mid part of the last century, strict legislation was passed that made it illegal to grow this versatile crop in the U.S., largely due to its relationship to its high-THC relative, marijuana. As a result, cultivars that once thrived across the country have been lost or remained unimproved, and no significant work has been done on production techniques and variety developments. Previous processing facilities collapsed and market availability that once drove production and supply has ceased to exist.

    “So in many respects, it’s like starting from scratch,” said lead researcher on the project, Dr. Maru Kering. “We are now growing seeds that have been developed in Europe and elsewhere in a screening exercise to determine varieties adaptable to our soils and climatic conditions.”

    He explained that it is a learning process to figure out each variety’s performance and potential problems, like weed and pest infestations. “Having such data will be important in developing production management guidelines for Virginia producers to facilitate high yields in the future, if and when industrial hemp becomes legal to grow again in the commonwealth,” Kering added.

    The Industrial Hemp Field Day is being hosted by the university’s Agricultural Research Station (ARS), part of the university’s College of Agriculture. The ARS is responsible for carrying out the land-grant university’s mission of conducting scientific agriculture and food production research that will increase profitability for Virginia’s small, part-time and limited-resource farmers. Land-grant initiatives such as these help support and grow Virginia’s $91 billion agriculture and forest industry.

    The event is free and open to the public. It will be held 8 a.m. to noon, Thursday, August 17, at VSU’s Randolph Farm, 4414 River Road, Petersburg, VA. Participants should register by visiting www.ext.vsu.edu/calendar, and clicking on the event.

    For more information or if you are a person with a disability and desire any assistive devices, services or other accommodations to participate in this activity, please contact Agricultural Research Station at lmorris@vsu.edu or (804) 524-5151 / TDD (800) 828-1120 during business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. to discuss accommodations five (5) days prior to the event.

  41. Freeman Community Empowerment Day

    Back To School Event in Freeman, VA on August 19, 2017

    The 4th Annual Freeman Community Empowerment Day will be held on Saturday, August 19th from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm at the Inspiration Center (formerly Meljo’s), 21391 Governor Harrison Parkway, Freeman, Virginia. Hosted by ten partnering organizations, the goal of Freeman Community Empowerment Day is to connect the attendees with important community resources, to help local children prepare for the school year, and to foster fellowship. This family event is free and open to the public. Over 700 backpacks with schools supplies will be provided to area children. Attendees are encouraged to come out and enjoy the cookout, door prizes, clothing giveaway, games, moon bounces, face painting, third annual car show, and live Gospel Stage sponsored by WHLQ 105.5 Hot Joy Radio!

    Many community agencies will be represented in the resource fair including Brunswick County Sheriff's Office, Cooperative Extension Office, Improvement Association, NDUTime, Brunswick County Public Schools Family Engagement, Inspiration Center, YMCA of Emporia-Greensville, Southside Virginia Community College, Old Dominion University, Dominion Power, Second Chance, Virginia Housewives of Finance, Litter Control, Longwood Small Business Development Center, Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services, Turning Point Family Services, DNC, Nutrition & Health, and the VCU Massey Cancer Center's Cancer Research and Resource Center of Lawrenceville and more!

    The Fourth Annual Freeman Community Empowerment Day is a collaborative effort of the following churches:  First Baptist Church, First Church of Christ (Holiness) USA, Mount Calvary Baptist Church, New Hope RZUA Church, Pleasant Grove Church of Christ Disciples of Christ, Union Bethel RZUA Church (all of Freeman Virginia), Zion Baptist Church (of Purdy, VA), the Coalition for Delaying Parenthood in Youth and WHLQ 105.5 Hot Joy Radio.

    For information, please email Vondrenna Smithers at vnsmithers@gmail.com

  42. Virginians Unite in Wake of Charlottesville Hate and Violence

    Rebublicans and Democrats, Liberal and Conservitive, Black and White have all condemed the violence sparked by a planned rally of white supremicists in Charlottesville, Virginia on Saturday, August 11, 2017. Below are the statements from people from all sides.

    REPUBLICAN PARTY OF VIRGINIA CHAIRMAN JOHN WHITBECK STATEMENT

    ON EVENTS IN CHARLOTTESVILLE

    “The Republican Party was created to end slavery in the mid-1800’s and our Party today continues to stand for equality for all persons regardless of their race or ethnicity. We condemn the hatred and racism on display today in Charlottesville and note that there is nothing conservative about messages of that nature.”

    “Virginia Republicans, Democrats and Independents are all unified in rejecting their message.”

    Statement from DPVA Chairwoman Condemning

    Planned White Nationalist Rally in Charlottesville

    Richmond, Va. – Today, Democratic Party of Virginia Chairwoman Susan Swecker released the following statement condemning last night’s violent demonstration and today’s planned rally by white nationalists in Charlottesville:

    “Last night’s hateful parade by white supremacists in Charlottesville was a cowardly and bigoted attack on every Virginian. I am horrified and personally disgusted by this racist demonstration against the Charlottesville community and our commonwealth’s cornerstone values of equality and fairness. The hate we saw last night has no place in our country in 2017 — and is a direct assault on everything I know and love about our commonwealth.

    “The vile protests planned for this weekend seek to divide us — and provoke us — with their hate. I urge everyone to heed the words of Governor McAuliffe and Lieutenant Governor Northam and deny these racist protests the attention they desperately want — and instead stand together as neighbors, citizens, Virginians and Americans to build a more just and inclusive future for our commonwealth in the weeks and months ahead.”

    GILLESPIE STATEMENT ON EVENTS IN CHARLOTTESVILLE

    2017 Republican gubernatorial nominee Ed Gillespie today released the following statement on the events in Charlottesville:

    “Having a right to spew vile hate does not make it right. It is painful to see these ugly events in Charlottesville last night and today. These displays have no place in our Commonwealth, and the mentality on display is rejected by the decent, thoughtful and compassionate fellow Virginians I see every day. I know we all appreciate the law enforcement officials maintaining order and protecting public safety there.”

    Dr. Northam on Planned Rally in Charlottesville

    Richmond, Va. – Today, Dr. Ralph Northam released the following statement regarding last night’s demonstration and today’s planned rally by white supremacists in Charlottesville.

    "The cornerstone of what makes our commonwealth a wonderful place to live is all that we share in common, not the things that set us apart. The community of Charlottesville has been asked twice now in recent months to defend our values of openness, diversity, and inclusion against an ideology of hatred and bigotry -- no community should have to bear that burden in 2017.

    "White supremacists have descended upon Charlottesville again to evoke a reaction as ugly and violent as their beliefs -- just as they did before, I am urging Virginians to deny them the satisfaction."

    KAINE STATEMENT ON WHITE NATIONALIST

    DEMONSTRATIONS & VIOLENCE IN CHARLOTTESVILLE

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, U.S. Senator Tim Kaine released the following statement in response to the recent displays of violence and bigotry by white nationalists in Charlottesville:

    "Virginia has come so far in recent decades to put division behind us. Both Anne and I are so proud of this progress. It's sickening to see the displays of violence and bigotry that were brought to Charlottesville by white nationalists over the last 24 hours, which tragically led to injuries and at least one death today. This is not who we are. Charlottesville is a vibrant community that recognizes the deep scars from our past and has rejected hatred in favor of inclusion.

     "The fact that people like David Duke cited the President to justify their views is a disturbing reminder that divisive rhetoric has sadly contributed to a climate where individuals who espouse hate feel emboldened. As they seek publicity through their hateful tactics, let's pull together--regardless of party, race or religion--to reject hatred in no uncertain terms and stand together. I'm encouraged by the words of leaders on both sides of the aisle who have spoken out forcefully against what has occurred today, and it's critical that we follow up those words with action that builds a more inclusive future.  We call ourselves a Commonwealth because the word signifies community. It's who we are and we won't go backwards."

    STATEMENT OF U.S. SEN. MARK R. WARNER
    ~ On violence in Charlottesville ~

    WASHINGTON — U.S. Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-VA) released the following statement in response to the violence in Charlottesville, VA:

    “Virginians mourn the life taken in this morning's events and reject this hateful violence in Charlottesville. We condemn the intolerance behind it and those who would pass it off as a legitimate political movement.

    “Those who traveled to Virginia to incite unrest don't understand the Virginia-born values that make our country great.

    “I have been in touch today with the Governor's Office and the Mayor, and stand prepared to help connect them with any additional federal resources that might be needed. My thoughts are with the victims, the great people of Charlottesville, and the police and first responders who restored order. I will continue to monitor the situation in Charlottesville and pray for its peaceful resolution.”

    House Dems Statement on Violence in Charlottesville

    RICHMOND, Va.– House Democratic Leader David J. Toscano and Caucus Chair Charniele Herring today issued the following joint statement on yesterday’s violence in Charlottesville:

    “We are sickened and saddened by the actions of thousands of white supremacists yesterday in Charlottesville. Their actions, driven by hate, represent an assault on American values that we hold dear. We grieve for the families of Heather Heyer, killed in an apparent act of domestic terrorism, and Virginia State Police Lieutenant H. Jay Cullen and Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates, who were just doing their jobs in trying to keep us safe. We thank the hundreds of state and local police, medics, emergency personnel, and clergy who struggled mightily on our behalf in response to this crisis. All of our elected leaders, including our President, must condemn white supremacy and domestic terrorism in the strongest possible terms. As we mourn today for those killed, we resolve to honor their legacies by rededicating ourselves to the principles of equality, diversity, and inclusiveness. We urge every Virginia to fight darkness with light, and to find the courage to call out hate when you see it, no matter how polished or disguised.”

    Virginia Legislative Black Caucus Statement in the Aftermath of the Unite the Rally in Charlottesville

    Racism, hatred and discrimination and deadly violence must not be tolerated in Virginia and will not be acceptable by the Virginia Legislative Black Caucus. Our forefathers and Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. died to fight against such violence and our civil rights.  We must unite and stand for equality for all against white supremacy in our country." Delegate Roslyn Tyler, Chair Virginia Legislative Black Caucus

     

     

     

  43. NAACP Responds to Charlottesville Violence

    “As people can see now very clearly, not voting has consequences,” stated Janette Martin, president of the Albemarle-Charlottesville NAACP. "On numerous occasions the city of Charlottesville has spent thousands of dollars to support KKK rallies - public money that could have gone toward the education of our youth. Today’s actions had nothing at all to do with exercising the right to free speech," Martin added. "These people came here with intent to commit domestic terrorism. Plain and simple. They have been emboldened by the words and vocabulary of elected officials at the highest levels."  Martin concluded, " we commend people of faith here in Charlottesville for working hard to set a moral tone, and sacrificing themselves and their safety to drown out the message of hate.”

    “The terrible incidence of violence in Charlottesville is a painful reminder of the  blatant racism, unbridled lynchings and other violence against citizens of African descent that permeated the history of this country,” said Linda Thomas, president of the Virginia State Conference of the NAACP. "This goes to the very core of the existence of the NAACP and our continuing struggle against forces of hate." 

     "White supremacists and today’s purveyors of hate should find no shadows in which to hide. Our forefathers shed blood so that in 2017, this type of violence would be a footnote of the past." Added Thomas, "We applaud our governor, Terry McAuliffe, who's statement today is in alignment with the NAACP mission. And we encourage the Governor to use the full force of his executive powers to eradicate race based barriers in all areas of life within the state. The Virginia State Conference will remain steadfast in our advocacy and activism as we push forward in our fight for legislative changes, expansion of voting rights and sound public policies that equally serve and protect all citizens within the commonwealth. And we will persist until we drive racism, and racist behavior from our midst." 

    “We at the national NAACP applaud and appreciate President Trump’s disavowment of the hatred which bared its ugly face in one of our great American cities today,” said Derrick Johnson, interim president and CEO of the NAACP. “But we caution that his repeated rhetoric has helped to fuel this climate of division and derision, and it has to change. Our hearts and prayers are with the families of those who lost their lives in Charlottesville. We stand firm with our commitment to acknowledge our differences, to embrace them as the richness of the American mosaic and we’ll continue to lead the fight for the right to peaceably assemble.”

  44. William Carlton Connell, Jr.

    William Carlton Connell, Jr., of South Brunswick, Virginia, born July 18, 1957, died peacefully at home surrounded by his loving family on August 10, 2017. “Carl” as he was affectionately known by his family and friends, worked for Woodman Life Insurance Company for over 33 years. It was during that time he helped build the East Virginia Youth Camp. An avid outdoorsman, Carl loved to cook, fish and hunt and could often be found doing all three with his buddies at Taylor Mill Hunt Club in Emporia. A man of few words, he was never interested in praise but was always doing good deeds.

    Carl is survived by his wife of 41 years, Ann; a son Andrew, and wife Krystle; daughter Lesley Nunn, husband Patrick. Perhaps his greatest joys in life were his five grandchildren, Drew Connell, Kelsey Carter, Harper and Van Walker Nunn, and the newest addition, Ava Marie Connell. He enjoyed school programs, football, softball and baseball games, golf tournaments and having them visit the farm.  He is also survived by his mother and father, Carlton and Ella Connell; two sisters, Amy Clary and her husband David, Beverly Washburn and her husband Kent; one niece, Laura Eddings and her husband Chris, and three nephews Chase and Alex Clary, and Collin Washburn.  Funeral services will be conducted 2:00 p.m. Saturday at Williams Funeral Home, Lawrenceville with interment at James Square Baptist Church Cemetery.  The family will receive friends Friday from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at Williams Funeral Home, Lawrenceville.  

  45. Albert Randolph Jarratt

    Albert Randolph Jarratt, 79, of Emporia, Virginia, passed away Monday, August 7, 2017. He was preceded in death by his parents, Roy and Adele Jarratt of Capron; his wife, Patricia S. Jarratt and daughter, Teresa J. Ferguson. Mr. Jarratt is survived by a son, Keith Powell of Monticello, Georgia; daughter, Rebecca Jarratt of Emporia; three grandchildren, Ethan Powell, and Amanda and Vanessa Gaynor; five step-children; two sisters, Louise Wells, Rebecca J. Newsome (Dennis); brother, Alfred Leroy Jarratt (Loretta), all of Emporia.

    “Buddy”, as he was known by family and friends, retired after 40 years as a long-distance truck driver. For the last seven years, he had been a resident of Emporia Manor where they assisted him living with the effects of Alzheimer’s. He was loved by all who knew him and will be dearly missed.

    The family will receive friends 11-12 p.m. on Friday, August 11 at Owen Funeral Home, 303 S. Halifax Rd., Jarratt, Virginia. The funeral service will be held graveside 12:30 p.m., also on Friday August 11 at Capron Cemetery officiated by Pastor Troy Green. Online condolences may be made at www.owenfh.com

  46. The Good News about Shoulder, Knee and Hip Joints Community Out-Reach Education

    Joints can be damaged by arthritis and other diseases or injuries. Arthritis, or simply years of use may cause the joint to wear away. This can cause pain, stiffness, and swelling. Your doctor may suggest a joint replacement to improve your quality of life. When something goes wrong with the shoulder, hip and knee joints, what are the options for treatment? Can joint injections help? What can joint protection exercise/therapy do for you?

    If you are seeking answers to questions like these you should attend August's C.O.R.E. (Community Out-Reach Education) Program at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital’s Rehab & Exercise Therapy Center to learn more about shoulder, knee and hip joints.

    This FREE program will be on Thursday, August 10th at 11:00 a.m. in the CMH Rehab and Exercise Therapy Center located at 750 Lombardy Street in South Hill.

    Patti Turczany, PT, LAT, MS, CDT/MLD will be the speaker for the program. Patti received her Bachelor’s degree from Southern Connecticut State University, a Master’s degree in Education with a concentration in Athletics from Fort Hayes State University in Kansas and a Master of Science degree from the University of Indianapolis Krannert School of Physical Therapy. She holds an oncology certification, complete complex decongestive therapy certification in lymph drainage and has pediatric specialty. She is McKenzie trained in treatment of spine therapy, has manual skills training in therapy, orthopedic training and is a certified licensed athletic trainer.

    Another joint information class for 2017 will be held from 11:00AM – 12:00PM at the CMH Rehab and Exercise Therapy Center on the following date: October 12.

    Reservations are not required for this program; however, they are recommended. For more information or to register to attend, please call (434) 774-2506.

  47. It’s MORE CONVENIENT than Ever to Apply for Social Security Benefits

    By Jackie Weisgarber, Social Security Public Affairs Specialist in Richmond, Virginia

    You’ve worked hard your whole life, and receiving your Social Security benefits should be the icing on the cake at your retirement party.We’re working hard to make it as quick and seamless as possible for you to apply for benefits from Social Security.

    Simply visit www.socialsecurity.gov/applyforbenefitsto get started.Through our safe and secure website, you can apply for:

    o    Retirement benefits;

    o    Spousal benefits;

    o    Medicare;

    o    Disability benefits;

    o    Extra Help with Medicare prescription drug plan costs; and, in some cases,

    o    Supplemental Security Income.

    You don’t have to be internet savvy to finish most of our online applications in one sitting with your computer. Or, if you prefer, we offer you the options to apply in person at your Social Security office or by telephone with one of our application representatives. Please call 1-800-772-1213 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays to schedule an appointment.

    You should also call us to schedule an appointment if you wish to apply for certain family benefits, including those for surviving spouses and children, divorced spouses and dependent children, and parents of beneficiaries.

    After you’ve applied for benefits — whether online, by phone, or in person — you can securely and quickly check the status of a pending claim through your online my Social Security account. If you haven’t created your account yet, you can do so today by visiting www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.

    You can also use my Social Security to view estimates of how much you would receive in retirement benefits and potential disability benefits and how much your loved ones could receive in family or survivor benefits.

    We’re with you throughout life’s journey, from applying for your first job to receiving your first retirement payment. And we’re proud to help ensure a secure future for you and your loved ones.

    To learn more about our programs and online services, please visit www.socialsecurity.gov.

  48. How Do You Celebrate a 99th Birthday? With Friends and Family

    Evelyn Newsome, born in August, 1918 - just before the end of the First World War celebrated her 99th birthday on Sunday, surrounded by her Grandchildren, Great Grandchildren, Great-Great Grandchldren and her Church Family.

  49. Family Hopes to Revitalize Jarratt With New Business

    Tommy and Judy Parker, grew up in Jarratt, have returned home. The couple always knew that they would return, even keeping ther home when Judy was called to Harlem to head up a literacy program.

    Judy has been retired from that program for a few weeks, since just after the shop opened.

    Tommy and Judy, along with their son Mike and his wife Mandy, who take care of the Social Media (check out their Facebook Page here), take part in this family operation. Even their granddaughter has photographs available for sale in the store.

    The store is an eclectic mix of antique china, furniture and local products. There is local honey, local produce (on Saturday), local pecans (and, seriously, if you go for nothing else, get a bag of Crazy Aunt Amy's Pecans) and local peanuts in addition to artisan cutting boards and furniture repurposed by Tommy.  All of the products in the shop come from the immediate area.

    The shop is located at 117 Jarratt Avenue in Jarratt

     

     

         

         

         

         

  50. Meherrin Regional Library offers free eclipse viewing glasses to patrons

    The Meherrin Regional Library System has joined more than 1,000 libraries across the country to participate in the celestial event of the century, the August 21, 2017 Solar Eclipse. During this nationwide event, the moon will pass between the earth and the sun, causing total or partial darkness throughout the U.S.

    In Brunswick and Greensville counties, the eclipse will begin around 1:15 PM, reach maximum obscurity around 2:45 PM, and end around 4:00 PM.

    Because Virginia will only experience a partial eclipse, those wishing to view it must wear protective eyewear that can filter out light and prevent damage to their eyes. There is no point where the eclipse will be safe to view directly without a solar filter.

    Beginning August 14, 2017, Brunswick County Library in Lawrenceville and Richardson Memorial Library in Emporia will offer a free pair of eclipse viewing glasses and safe viewing info to patrons when they use their library card. Supply is limited, however, and will be on a first come, first served basis.

    For more information, stop by or call the Brunswick County Library at (434) 848-2418 x301, or Richardson Memorial Library at (434) 634-2539 or visit www.meherrinlib.org.

  51. Adam Bryant Harrell

    Adam Bryant Harrell, 33, of Emporia, Virginia passed away on Thursday, August 3, 2017.  His passing was heartbreaking to those who knew and loved him.  Adam was born on March 8, 1984 in Emporia, Virginia where he was raised on a small farm by two loving parents whom he cared for deeply.  Growing up, he developed a passion for the outdoors.  Adam was the definition of an outdoorsman, spending many days with family and friends hunting, hiking, camping, and fishing.  Adam excelled at athletics, acquiring numerous accolades in football and helped lead his high school football team to a state title.  Adam graduated from Brunswick Academy in 2002 before leaving to study at High Point University in North Carolina, earning a degree in Criminal Justice 2006.  After college Adam started a career in loss prevention culminating in him overseeing more than 80 stores throughout the state.  Perhaps Adam’s most significant moment was when he followed in his father’s footsteps when he married the “rose of his life” in 2010. 

    Though Adam will be remembered for his love of the outdoors, he will be best remembered by those who knew him as a “shirt-off-his-back guy,” a steadfast Christian, a faithful and supportive husband, a loving son, and a devoted friend.  The joy and excitement he had for life was contagious as anyone who knew him knew.  His story will live on in each and every person his life touched.

    He was preceded in death by his grandparents Nelson and Elsie Harrell; grandfather Tom Jarratt; and grandfather Richard Jones.  He is survived by his grandmother Etta Jarratt; beloved parents, Ricky and Joan Harrell; loving wife and hunting companion, Jo Swartz Harrell along with their unborn child and family dog, Molly; father in-law and mother in-law Mark and Mary Jane Yeattes; uncle Benji Jones; uncle Benji Jarratt and wife Hope; aunt DeEtte Gordon and husband Brent; cousin Eric Jones and wife Brandi, cousin Leslie Sabo and husband Chuck; cousin Courtney Moseley and husband Brian; brother-in-law Mark Yeattes; sister in-law Mary Yeattes; sister in-law Sarah Yeattes, and numerous cousins.

    A visitation will be held 5-8 p.m. on Tuesday, August 8that Owen Funeral Home in Jarratt, Virginia where the funeral service will be held 2pm on Wednesday, August 9th.  Interment will be private.

  52. Doris Marie Carlisle

    Doris Marie Carlisle, 68, formerly Doris Carlisle Tomlin, of Skippers, passed away Friday, August 4, 2017.  She was preceded in death by her parents, James Acey Carlisle and Mary "Pig" Finch Carlisle; her former husband, Sam Patton Tomlin; a brother, Daniel H. "Danny" Carlisle and a sister, Shirley Diane Fisher.

    Mrs. Carlisle is survived by two daughters, Terry D. Tomlin-Vaughan and husband, Austin and Samantha Tomlin and wife, Carla Aphayboun-Tomlin; grandchildren, Korye Aphayboun-Tomlin and Bianca Oliva-Tomlin; Brittany Myers; great-grandchildren, Riley Myers and Kitai;  a sister, Sandra Kaye Tomlinson; two brothers, James F. Carlisle and Walter "Butch" Carlisle and wife, Beverly and numerous nieces, nephews and a large extended family.

    A memorial service will be held 5 p.m. Monday, August 7, 2017 at Harvest Temple Pentecostal Holiness Church, 2767 W. 10th St, Roanoke Rapids, NC. In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial contributions be made to the SPCA  or to a local animal shelter. 

  53. Josy M. Moore

    Josy M. Moore passed away at home after a brief illness on August 3, 2017.  Josy was born December 16, 1932 to Thomas C. and E. Maie Moore of Lawrenceville, Virginia.  Josy is survived by her husband of 66 years, the Reverend Charles A. Moore of Emporia and their children Charles A.(Andy) Moore, Jr. (Connie) of Kenbridge, Dr. Kathy M. Baker (Tim) of Chesterfield, and Betsy M. Draper (Calvin) of Emporia; grandchildren Tracy Moore, Emily Ligon (Brian), Kelli Wyatt (Lance), Zach Baker, Kait Baker and Allison Draper; and great grandchildren Matthew and Max Ligon.  Josy was a retired sales associate with Peebles Department Store and worked at the Samaritan House Thrift Store until her final illness.  Charles and Josy served God together at Warfield Baptist Church in Warfield, Virginia for more than 60 years and thereafter have enjoyed a fulfilling membership at Main Street Baptist Church in Emporia.  Visitation will be held at Main Street Baptist Church in Emporia on Saturday, August 5, 2017 from 6 to 8 pm. Funeral services will be held at Main Street Baptist Church on Sunday, August 6, 2017 at 2 pm with internment to follow at Warfield Baptist Church Cemetery in Warfield, Virginia.  Williams Funeral Home, Lawrenceville will be handling the arrangements.

  54. VPSA Big Game Contest Coming in September

    The Virginia Peninsula Sportsmen's Association (VPSA), in cooperation with the VDGIF, will be hosting its annual BIG GAME CONTEST to recognize those successful Sportsmen who harvested citation size Deer, Bear, and Turkey last season.  This year the contest will include a western Regional, Eastern Regional, and State Competition under one roof.  The event is September 23 & 24 at the Southampton County Fairgrounds.  Each day the show will be open from 9-5.  Entries must be received by 5PM on Saturday September 23.  Cost of the event is $10 for a weekend pass or $7 per day.  12 and under as VPSAll as active duty military are free.

    The VPSA, headquartered in Williamsburg, is a group of sportsmen who serve sportsmen.  VPSA founded the BIG GAME CONTEST in 1940 and developed the Virginia Scoring System for Deer and Bear.  In the early years VPSA assisted the game department with the Whitetail Deer recovery effort in the Commonwealth.  VPSA members had a deer holding pen in Newport News, which is today known as Deer Park.  This contest is the oldest in the country and VPSA has 78 years of records from the Commonwealth of Virginia.  Annually VPSA receive many great entries from the Greensville, Southampton, and Brunswick County area Sportsmen of Virginia.  Youth hunters are highly encouraged to attend as VPSA have an entire youth division!

    Successful sportsment wishing to enter a Deer, Bear, or Turkey in the Contest must have a valid confirmation number or game tag from last hunting season.  For Deer we need the antlers to measure; for Bear we need the skull to measure, and for turkey we need the spurs, beard, and certified weight card.  If you have an entry you are free to enter the show at but there will be a $15 per animal fee to score the animal.

    In the deer category we have divisions for archery, muzzleloader, and gun harvests.  We have one division for Bear and one for turkey.  Additionally we have an entire division dedicated to youth hunters.  We award trophies for the top 3 scores in all divisions and state citations for all those who meet the minimum score for a citation. 

    So for example if a you are a Youth VPSA member who harvested a huge buck in Greensville county.  Theoretically you could come home with a State Citation for that buck, VPSA member only contest trophy, Youth Division trophy,  Eastern Regional trophy, and State trophy for that one buck! 

    For more information, email Michael.h.jones52@gmail.com or text or call 757-371-3335.

  55. WARNER, ISAKSON INTRODUCE BIPARTISAN BILL TO PRESERVE PATIENT ACCESS TO HOME INFUSION SERVICES

    ~ Bill would create a temporary transitional payment for home infusion services ~

    WASHINGTON – U.S. Sens. Mark R. Warner (D-VA) and Johnny Isakson (R-GA), members of the Senate Finance Committee, today introduced bipartisan legislation to create a temporary transitional reimbursement structure for Medicare home infusion services.

    A version of legislation introduced by Sens. Warner and Isakson last Congress to restructure the way Medicare beneficiaries who need intravenous medication receive their infusion treatments from the comfort of their home was included in the landmark 21st Century Cures Act last year. However, the Cures bill did not properly align the change in payments with the new benefit, leading to a four-year gap during which patients would have challenges securing these life-saving treatments. This legislation ensures that patients receiving home infusion treatments maintain their access to these services until policies from the 21st Century Cures Act are implemented in 2021.

    “Home infusion is a safe and effective alternative to inpatient care for many patients,” said Sen. Warner. “This bill expands on the progress made on 21st Century Cures by creating a transitional payment system that will allow Medicare to continue paying accurately for the drugs, while also protecting patients’ access to important services. This commonsense fix will help the Medicare program provide high-quality, lower-cost care, benefiting both patients and taxpayers.”

    “Infusion therapy delivered in the home setting is the most desirable, convenient and by far the most cost-effective. We made important progress for modern medicine in the 21st Century Cures Act, and the home infusion therapy legislation that Senator Warner and I included in that bill makes a real difference for patients who need safe and effective treatments,”said Sen. Isakson. “Home infusion technology is a tremendous contribution to quality health care, and this legislation builds on the Cures Act to help ensure home infusion remains accessible.”

    The legislation is cosponsored by Sens. Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), Michael Bennet (D-CO), Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Sherrod Brown (D-OH), Ben Cardin (D-MD), Chris Coons (D-DE), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), Chuck Grassley (R-IA), Angus King (I-ME), Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), David Perdue (R-GA), Rob Portman (R-OH), Pat Roberts (R-KS), Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), and Roger Wicker (R-MS).

    “This bill builds upon previous legislation so Medicare beneficiaries can receive infusion treatments at home,”Sen. Grassley said.  “This is an option that Medicare beneficiaries sought, and it’s a common sense, cost-effective way to provide care.  The private sector recognized this long ago.  Medicare should continue to reflect the modern practice of medicine and offer the best way of meeting a medical need at the lowest cost.”

    TheMedicare Home Infusion Therapy Access Act of 2017 would create a transitional reimbursement for Medicare home infusion services. Starting in January 2017, the 21st Century Cures Act changed the payment for home infusion drugs, aligning them with payments for other drugs paid under Medicare’s Part B benefit. The 21st Century Cures Act also created a new reimbursement structure for the professional services associated with home infusion, which is set to take effect in 2021. The four-year gap between the January 2017 drug payment change and the implementation of the infusion services payment in 2021 may threaten the accessibility of home-infusion therapy. This bill would help smooth the transition to more accurate payments for home infusions drugs while also protecting patients’ access to these medications until the new home infusion benefit is implemented in 2021.

    Sens. Warner, Isakson, Roberts, Grassley, Cardin, Brown, Portman, and Bennet are all members of the Senate Finance Committee, which has jurisdiction over Medicare.

    The legislation is supported by:Accreditation Commission for Health Care (ACHC),  American Association of Heart Failure Nurses,  American Association for Homecare,  American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN),  Amerita, Inc., American Association for Homecare, Appalachian Home Infusion, ARJ Infusion Services, Best Option Healthcare PR, Inc., Big Sky IV Care, BioScrip, BJC Home Care Services Pharmacy, Brooks Home I.V., Inc., CarePro Health Services, CGH Medical Center, Chartwell Midwest Wisconsin, LLC, Chartwell Pennsylvania, LP, Choice CriticalCare Inc., Consortium of Clinical Immunologists (CIIC), Coram, CVS Specialty Infusion, Services, Druid City Vital Care, EMED Technologies, EMZA USA LLC & DeliverIt Pharmacy Inc., Fairview Health Services, Gates Healthcare Associates, Inc., Grifols, Hobbs Pharmacy, Home Health United Xtra Care Pharmacy, Home Parenteral Services, Horizon Healthcare Services, ICU Medical Inc., Infusion Solutions, Inc., Innovatix, INS, Intra Pump Infusion Systems, Intramed Plus, IV Solutions, LLC, John Hopkins Care Group, Kaup Pharmacy, Inc., Lakeland Home, Infusion, Liberty Medical Specialties, Inc., Medical Accounts Receivable Solutions, Inc. (MARs), Medical Alternatives, MK Infusion Pharmacy, LLC., MSD, Nation's Home Infusion, NuCara IV Services, One Source Homecare Services, OptiMed Infusion Services, Option Care, OptionOne Pharmacy, Paragon Healthcare Inc., Pediatric Home Service, Pharmacare Health Specialists, PharmaScript Inc., Preferred Homecare, Premier Infusion Care, Premier Nursing Group, LLC, Premier Point Home Health, Inc., PromptCare Home Infusion, LLC, Redline Specialty Pharmacy, SBH Medical, Ltd., Sentara Home Infusion Pharmacy, Sentara HealthCare, Simfarose Pharmaceutical Specialty, Smiths Medical, Soleo Health, Spectrum Infusion, Inc., TANYR Healthcare, The Immune Deficiency Foundation (IDF), The National Home Infusion Association (NHIA), Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, UnityPoint at Home, University of Iowa Community HomeCare, VGM Group Inc., Vital Care, Inc., and the VNA Home Infusion Therapy Pharmacy.

    Companion legislation was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Reps. Pat Tiberi (R-OH) and Bill Pascrell (D-NJ) and has been referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and in addition to the Committee on Ways and Means  (H.R. 3163). The full text of the legislation is available here.

  56. Southside Virginia Community College Recognizes K-12 Partners

    At the July 2017 Board reception held at the John H. Daniel Campus in Keysville, Dr. Al Roberts recognized the K-12 partners who help to ensure the success of Southside Virginia Community College.  The partnership the college has with the local public school divisions and private schools is great, he said.  "Together, we have lead the Commonwealth in the establishment of dual enrollment programs and continue to be among the state's leaders in participation as well as in the number of college certificates and degrees awarded through dual enrollment.  SVCC is proud to serve as host to the Governor's School of Southside Virginia which provides gifted, highly motivated high school juniors and seniors in the region a challenging, interdisciplinary program of studies," Dr. Roberts said.   

    He also noted high school partners host the SVCC Career Coaches who work with students to promote secondary education and training.  There are also successful STEM Camps, professional development activities and teacher recertification courses.  Dr. Roberts thanked all those dedicated to supporting the college mission and their dedication to the well-being of the citizens of Southside Virginia.

    Dr. Al Roberts (left to right), presents SVCC book bag to Dr. Jack McKinley, Superintendent of Schools for Amelia County, along with SVCC Local Board Chair Sid Smyth.

    Dr. Al Roberts (left to right), presents SVCC book bag to Dora Wynn, Superintendent of Schools for Brunswick  County, along with SVCC Local Board Chair Sid Smyth.

    Dr. Al Roberts (left to right), presents SVCC book bag to Dr. Angela Wilson, Superintendent of Schools for Greensville  County, along with SVCC Local Board Chair Sid Smyth.

    Dr. Al Roberts (left to right), presents SVCC book bag to Dr. Mark Lineburg, Superintendent of Schools for Halifax County, along with SVCC Local Board Chair Sid Smyth

    Dr. Al Roberts (left to right), presents SVCC book bag to Paul Nichols, Superintendent of Schools for Mecklenburg County, along with SVCC Local Board Chair Sid Smyth
     

  57. SVCC Nursing Club Donates to Local Cancer Care Fund

    SOUTH HILL, VA– The Southside Virginia Community College Nursing Club made a recent generous donation to support VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital’s Cancer Care Fund.  Pictured: (L to R) Brandi Harrell, SVCC Nursing Club member; Molly Buchholz, SVCC Nursing Club President; Ken Kurz, Director of Marketing & Development at VCU Health CMH; Ashley Willis, Registered Nurse at the VCU Health CMH Hendrick Cancer Center and Shannon Lambert, Manager CMH Foundation & VCU Health CMH’s Pharmacy Connection.

    The donation benefits the “CMH Cancer Patient Care Fund”established for cancer patients in financial need.

    Donations to the “CMH Cancer Patient Care Fund” help offset emergency needs such as transportation, treatment and medication costs for cancer patients. Supporting the cancer care fund can give these patients peace of mind knowing that the inability to cover these costs will not stand in the way of their treatment. 

  58. DON’T GET SCHOOLED, GET SMART ABOUT SOCIAL SECURITY

    By Jackie Weisgarber, Social Security Public Affairs Specialist in Richmond, Virginia

    Your summer job might be ending soon. You might even hold a part time job while you’re in school. You can easily jump to the head of the class and secure your future with a few simple steps. As a young worker, you’re in the best position for planning, investing, and saving for your retirement, growing that nest egg as large as it can be. The sooner you start, the more money you’ll have.

    There are two easy ways to get started in preparing for retirement:

    Open a free online my Social Security account with Social Security. Having a personal and secure account is easy, but better yet, it empowers you. You can access the services you need in the convenience of your own home or on the go without traveling to a Social Security office. To open or access your account, go to www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.

    Many of our resources are available online and my Social Security is one of the best places to access vital information about your retirement. We are constantly adding new features to make your experience with us faster and more convenient. You can even replace your lost or misplaced Social Security card online in certain areas.

    You could also start a myRA account. myRA is designed for people who don’t have a retirement savings plan through their employer, or are limited from other savings options. Check it out at www.myra.gov. If your employer provides a retirement savings plan, such as a 401(k), learn more about that plan’s potential matching contributions or other benefits. It’s never too early, and the more you save now, the more you’ll have later.

    Did you know that a 20-year-old has a 1-in-4 chance of becoming disabled before reaching full retirement age? Social Security will be there for you if you become disabled and cannot work. Accessing your online account can also help you determine your estimated future disability benefits. To learn more about disability and to apply, go to www.socialsecurity.gov/disabilityssi/apply.html.

    The earlier you start preparing for the future, the more comfortable that future will be. Like a good friend, Social Security has your back when it comes to retirement planning or in the unfortunate event of disability. Learn more at www.socialsecurity.gov.  

  59. New State Board Chair Focused on Increasing Community College Enrollments

    RICHMOND – Eleanor Saslaw begins her yearlong term as the chair of the Virginia State Board for Community College this month, and she is focusing on increasing community college enrollment.

    Serving on the board for the last three years – including one year as the Board’s vice chair – represents only a fraction of the experience Saslaw brings to the post. After all, the two-time college graduate has spent her entire career working in education. Her experience ranges from being a teacher, counselor and director of student services in Fairfax County Public Schools, to serving as the president of the Virginia Counselors Association, to serving as a member of and the president of the Virginia Board of Education.

    Saslaw says educating an individual may just be the most important thing you can do for them and the community they live in.

    “If you don’t educate people, you end up supporting them,” she said. “We want to see Virginians succeeding in the 21st century; that includes new Virginians. More education means a higher standard of living. It means our businesses thrive, and it means our tax base is strong. Our community colleges do a terrific job of helping people get there.”

    Saslaw is placing a priority for the coming year on helping Virginia’s Community College serve more people. The colleges are seeking ways to reverse several years of enrollment declines. Saslaw wants the Board to ensure the colleges have the tools and knowledge to turn that around.

    “Chancellor DuBois and I have been talking about that and he shares my concerns,” Saslaw said. “We’ve had good luck in the past using the task force model to address big, statewide challenges. It may be time to do that here.”

    Saslaw was born in San Francisco and moved to the East Coast when she was eleven. She and her husband, state Senator Dick Saslaw (D-Fairfax County) moved to Virginia after getting married. They have a daughter who works as a lawyer in San Francisco.

    “I feel like I gave something back with that one,” Saslaw said.

    Saslaw has won numerous awards including the Friend of School Psychologists Award (2011) and Counselor of the Year (1998 and 1994). She has a master’s degree in secondary counseling and a bachelor’s degree in social studies education.

    About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

 

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