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Local Coronavirus Closings and Cancellations

Meherrin Regional Library - Brunswick County Library and Richardson Memorial Library

All City of Emporia Offices are Closed to the Public (Municipal Building, Police Department and Public Works)

Greensville County Circuit Court Clerk (Tentative Reopening Date April 6, 2020)

Bruswick County Government is Closed to the Public

During this State of Emergency most Nursing Homes have Cancelled all Visitation

During this State of Emergency most Hospitals have changed their Visitation Policies, Please call ahead

Please check with your destination for current visitation policies during this Public Health Emergency/State of Emergency before leaving home

To include your closing or cancellation on this list, please email news@emporianews.com

Current Weather Conditions

 
Seven Day Forecast for Emporia, Virginia
 

Community Calendar Sponsored By...

 

Update to School Lunches during Coronavirus Emergency

 

Greensville County Public Schools will be providing breakfast and lunch meals, during our emergency closure.  Meals will be provided to all children without charge.  Acceptance and participation requirements for the program and all activities are the same for all regardless of race, color, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, political affiliation, or against otherwise qualified persons with disabilities, and there will be no discrimination in the course of the meal service. Meals will be provided, on a first come, first serve basis.  We will bus meals to certain locations throughout the school district.

In order to decrease exposure time for staff and community, starting Monday, April 6, meals will be provided at our current sites at schools and bus stops in the community on Monday only. Your child(ren) will still receive 5 breakfast meals and 5 lunch meals.

We will not provide meals the week of April 13-17, 2020, our scheduled Spring Break.

We are doing our best to practice social distancing at our sites. Thank you for your patience, support, and understanding.

Please continue to check the division’s media outlets for updates.

Meals will be available for pick up at the sites and times as follows:



Location     

Days of Service

Greensville Elementary School

1011 Sussex Drive, Emporia, VA 23847

 


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 9:00 am.–12:00 pm


Greensville County High School

403 Harding Street, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 9:00 am.–12:00 pm


Old Brink School

Brink Road, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 10:00 am.–10:15 am


Skippers Post Office

5334 Skippers Road, Skippers, VA 23879


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 10:30 am.–10:45 am


Cain’s Mobile Home Park

299 Liberty Road, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 10:50am-11:00 am


Brook Ridge Apartments

1325 Skippers Road, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 11:05-11:20 am


Washington Park Ball Park

750 Dry Bread Road, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 10:00 am.­­-10:15 am


Meherrin River Park

1001 Meherrin Park Road, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 10:20 am.–10:30 am

 


Spring Hill Village Mobile Home Park (Both sides)

Lowground Road, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 10:40 am.–10:55 am


Falling Run Apartments

South Main Street, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 11:00 am.–11:15 am


Purdy Store

14 Smokey Ordinary Road, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 10:00 am.–10:15am


Jarratt Ball Park

South Braxton Ave, Jarratt VA 23867


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 10:30 am.–10:45 am


Blanks Lane

Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 10:55 am.–11:10 am


Woodruff Store

5559 Pleasant Shade Drive, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 10:00 am.–10:15 am


Scottsdale Trailer Court

Carter Road, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 10:20 am.–10:35 am


MS 58 Plaza

1001 Pleasant Shade Drive, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 10:40 am.–10:55 am


Reese Village

311 Bond Court, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 10:00 am.–10:15 am


Northwood Village

300 Lewis Street, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 10:20 am.–10:35am


McDonald’s Bus Parking Lot

905 Market Drive, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 10:40 am.–10:55 am


Top Hand Foundation

203 W Atlantic Street, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 11:00 am.–11:15 am


Unkle Odie’s

121 Courtland Road, Emporia, VA 23847


April 6 - June 12 Monday

Breakfast & Lunch 11:25 am.–11:40 am

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form (AD-3027), found online at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992.

Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

(1)    Mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights

1400 Independence Avenue, SW

Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

(2)    Fax: (202) 690-7442; or

(3)    Email: program.intake@usda.gov.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.    

Governor Northam Issues Statewide Stay at Home Order

RICHMOND—Governor Ralph Northam today issued a statewide Stay at Home order to protect the health and safety of Virginians and mitigate the spread of the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19. The executive order takes effect immediately and will remain in place until June 10, 2020, unless amended or rescinded by a further executive order.

The order directs all Virginians to stay home except in extremely limited circumstances. Individuals may leave their residence for allowable travel, including to seek medical attention, work, care for family or household members, obtain goods and services like groceries, prescriptions, and others as outlined in Executive Order Fifty-Three, and engage in outdoor activity with strict social distancing requirements.

The executive order also directs all Virginia institutions of higher education to stop in-person classes and instruction. Private campgrounds must close for short-term stays, and beaches will be closed statewide except for fishing and exercise. 

“We are in a public health crisis, and we need everyone to take this seriously and act responsibly,” said Governor Northam. “Our message to Virginians is clear: stay home. We know this virus spreads primarily through human-to-human contact, and that’s why it’s so important that people follow this order and practice social distancing. I’m deeply grateful to everyone for their cooperation during this unprecedented and difficult time.”

The full text of Executive Order Fifty-Five can be found here.

Last week, Governor Northam issued Executive Order Fifty-Three closing certain non-essential businesses, prohibiting public gatherings of more than 10 people, and directing all K-12 schools to remain closed for the rest of the academic year. A Frequently Asked Questions guide about Executive Order Fifty-Three can be found here.

For the latest information about the COVID-19 outbreak, visit virginia.gov/coronavirus or CDC.gov/coronavirus.

Up-to-Date Information on the Coronavirus/COVID-19

For the most accurate information available please visit any of the following sites:

Remember to Keep Your Social Distance -

  • Remain About 6 Feet Apart
  • No Gatherings of More Than 10 People

Shelter in Place, Leaving Your Home Only for:

  • Groceries
  • Pharmacy
  • Medical Care
  • Exercise/Walking the Dog

Wash Your Hands Thouroughly and Often with Soap and Water for at Least Twenty Seconds (Sing Happy Birthday Twice).

If you are unable to wash your hands, Use Hand Sanitizer with an Alcohol Content of at Least 60%

Tags: 

Jean Fitchett Clarke

June 9, 1933-April 6, 2020

Jean Fitchett Clarke, 86, of Emporia, VA, passed away on April 6, 2020. She was preceded in death by her beloved husband of 56 years, L.C. Clarke, two daughters, Pat Clarke, and Debbie Marshall and one grandson, Philip Marshall. Survivors include grandsons, Steven Selph and his wife Getra, Clarke Weeks and his wife Shannon, Andrew Marshall and great grandson Cole Weeks. Jean retired from the VA Department of Corrections where she served as Operations Officer for Greensville Correctional Center. A graveside service will be held at Matthews Chapel United Methodist Church. In lieu of flowers, the family requests contributions be sent to Monumental United Methodist Church, 300 Reese St. Emporia, VA, 23847, where she was a lifelong member.

Online condolences may be made at www.echolsfuneralhome.com

“Keep Both Eyes Open”

Well it is the time of giving
And of the taking too
There’s so many requests for helping out
What ever can we do?
 
Now one can usually spot the needy
Or a damsel in distress
Yet at times before contributing
It is good to second guess.
 
Each day we see some make attempt
To ply finds for a need
Still so many of them overlap
And at this one should heed.
 
Why don’t the secondary groups
Join the initial one in force
They could still have many wagons
But the need of just one horse.
 
You’ll find there are a lot of groups
All willing to help out
Still check out what each will provide
Then you can donate without a doubt!
 
                         - Roy E. Schepp

Workers urge Northam to sign minimum wage bill

By Ada Romano, Capital News Service

RICHMOND, Va. -- Workers and advocates are urging Gov. Ralph Northam to sign a bill that would raise the minimum wage to $9.50 at the start of next year. The General Assembly will reconvene on April 22, and lawmakers will reevaluate recently passed legislation as the state’s economy takes a blow and unemployment climbs during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Northam and state leaders anticipate the state’s economy will suffer a major hit from the coronavirus outbreak. Northam didn’t respond directly whether he is considering delaying the increase in minimum wage when asked at a recent press conference. 

“There are a number of pieces of legislation that we are looking at regarding our business environment, and I haven’t made any definite decisions, but we are talking to the patrons of those pieces of legislation,” Northam said. The governor said he will “make a decision in the best interest of Virginia and the best interest of our economy.”

Workers on the front lines of essential businesses continue to serve the public during the COVID-19 outbreak, including many workers who earn minimum wage–currently $7.25 in Virginia. 

Employees at a Virginia Kroger grocery store and Amazon distribution center recently tested positive for the coronavirus. Many essential workers have asked for an increase in pay to reflect the increased need for their services and the elevated risks they take while working. 

Anna Scholl, executive director of Progress Virginia, an advocacy organization, said that raising the minimum wage is necessary to allow these workers to raise their families with dignity. 

“That’s especially true now when grocery store workers, delivery drivers, home health aids and so many more are going to work for low wages and putting themselves at risk of getting sick so that we can stay home and healthy,” Scholl said in a press release. 

The group is asking Northam to sign House Bill 395 into law without amendments or delays that would water down the bill. HB 395 would raise the minimum wage to $9.50 in 2021, $11 in 2022 and $12 in 2023. The minimum wage could go up to $15 by 2026, if approved by the General Assembly. 

Some essential workers also argue that they are not being provided adequate protective gear and supplies to keep them safe from the coronavirus, another reason they are pushing for guaranteed wage increase.

Lisa Harris works at Kroger in Mechanicsville and is a member of the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union. She has been with Kroger for 13 years and said in a press conference organized by Progress Virginia that she would benefit directly from HB 395. She is urging Northam to sign the bill with no weakening amendments. 

“I find it fascinating how fast grocery store workers like me have gone from being considered unskilled labor to being recognized as essential personnel,” Harris said. 

She compared workers dealing directly with an increasingly infected public to being on the front lines like first responders and said “it would be nice to be paid accordingly.” 

Harris said Kroger is not observing the proper social distancing recommendation of 6 feet or providing workers with personal protective equipment. She said the staff is required to wipe down the self checkout scanners and screens every half hour but argues that this is impossible with the influx of customers visiting the store. Harris said the staff is given Windex to clean equipment and not a proper disinfectant. The company has given full-time workers a $300 bonus and part-time workers a $150 pay boost, but that’s not enough money, Harris said. 

“It means barely being able to support myself, it means making tough decisions about whether to pay a bill or skip a meal, it means calling on my family members to help me as I’m attempting to be a fully enfranchised 31-year old,” Harris said. 

Allison McGee, corporate affairs manager for Kroger, said the grocery chain provided all hourly workers with a $2 pay increase for hours worked March 29 through April 18. McGee also stated that all Kroger stores in the Richmond area have been provided with Environmental Protection Agency-registered disinfectants to wipe down counters and cash registers. She said employees are required to wipe down surfaces frequently and extra hand sanitizer bottles have been provided at each checkout station.

“As far as PPE, we are encouraging our associates to wear protective masks and gloves, and we’re working hard to secure these resources for our associates,” McGee stated in an email. “Supply has started to arrive for our associates, and we anticipate all locations having personal protective equipment within the next several weeks.”

Kroger said on its website that they want healthcare workers to get a hold of protective gear before they can properly distribute it to their workers. For now employees have limited access to such PPE and are encouraged to use their own.

Beginning April 7, Kroger will also start to limit the number of customers to 50% of the building code's calculated capacity to allow for proper physical distancing in stores, the company announced this week.

Michael Cassidy, executive director of The Commonwealth Institute for Fiscal Analysis, said that the coronavirus is a reminder many essential workers are also minimum wage workers. 

“These individuals are providing a vital service to us right now and they deserve more than $7.25 an hour,” Cassidy said.

Cassidy said if the minimum wage increase were to go into effect in January, it would help 46,000 healthcare workers, 100,00 retail workers and over 100,000 restaurant and service industry workers. He said this would allow people to buy more and contribute to businesses and the economy as a whole. 

“That’s important because consumer spending is the foundation of our economy, it’s about 72% of Virginia’s gross domestic product,” Cassidy said. 

Del. Danica Roem said in a tweet that she is extremely disappointed to see groups advocating for bills like HB 395 to be watered down or delayed. 

“We’re $1.50/hr behind West Virginia right now,” Roem tweeted. “You don’t see an uprising of West Virginian business leaders demanding the government lower their minimum wage to match ours.” 

Cassidy said history shows that increasing the minimum wage during a recession has been successful in bringing the economy back.
HB 395 is currently pending signature by Northam with a deadline of April 11.

Governor Northam Announces Additional Actions Providing Relief for Restaurants and Distilleries Impacted by COVID-19 Pandemic

~Executive directive defers collection of annual fees for ABC-issued licenses and permits, allows delivery of mixed beverages~

RICHMOND—Governor Ralph Northam today issued an executive directive authorizing the Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control Authority (ABC) to defer annual fees for licenses and permits that would be up for renewal through June. The Governor also directed the Virginia ABC to allow establishments with mixed beverage licenses, such as restaurants and distilleries, to sell mixed beverages through takeout or delivery, effective at midnight Thursday.

Under the Governor’s executive directive, the Virginia ABC will defer the collection of license renewal fees for 90 days from original expiration date for establishments with licenses expiring in March, April, May, and June. Any penalties that would normally be associated with the late payment of such fees will be waived. If a business loses their license, they would have to go back through the application process, which takes at least 30 days. This deferral will allow more than 6,000 licensed retail, wholesale and manufacturing businesses to reopen and conduct business more quickly once the crisis is passed. An estimated $4.5 million in payments will be deferred.

“This unprecedented health crisis has had a tremendous impact on businesses across the Commonwealth, and restaurants have been hit especially hard,” said Governor Northam. “Allowing restaurants and distilleries that remain open to sell mixed beverages with takeout or delivery orders will help them augment their revenue streams, so they can continue serving their customers and employing Virginians. These actions will give establishments with mixed beverage licenses greater flexibility to operate while their dining rooms are closed.”

Many Virginia restaurants have pivoted from dine-in establishments to a combination of takeout, delivery, or makeshift drive-thrus in an effort to maintain operations amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. These establishments often rely on alcohol sales to meet profit margins, and this temporary privilege will support restaurants that have lost a substantial stream of revenue from the sale of mixed beverages, and distilleries that have been unable to provide their products to the public and suffered financial losses.

“These deferrals will allow businesses to continue to operate without concern over choosing between keeping an employee or renewing a license,” said Virginia ABC Chief Executive Officer Travis Hill. “Without this relief, some closed businesses would be in the position of paying a fee for a license they can’t exercise or risk losing their license. Virginia ABC is committed to supporting retailers, restaurants and their employees during this pandemic.”

Earlier this week, Virginia ABC announced temporary in-state direct to consumer shipping privileges for local distilleries to provide industry members both small and large with a mechanism to get their product to consumers.

On March 20, Virginia ABC adjusted licensing regulations to permit businesses with only on-premise licenses to exercise off-premise privileges such as allowing the sale of wine or beer in sealed containers for curbside pickup in a designated area (parking lot, etc.), and delivery of those products to customers’ homes without needing a delivery permit. In order for licensed businesses to use this feature, both curbside pickup and delivery must be facilitated by a customer’s electronic order either online, over the phone or through an app.

Additionally, licensees with off-premise privileges, including breweries, farm wineries and wineries were allowed to sell products for curbside pickup in a designated area or deliveries to customers’ homes without obtaining an additional delivery permit. Distillery stores were enabled to deliver products to customers seated in their vehicle on the premises or in the parking lot of the distillery.

The full text of Executive Directive Ten is available here.

Visit abc.virginia.gov/covid-19 to learn more about actions Virginia ABC has taken in response to COVID-19. For additional information and resources to support Virginians impacted by the COVID-19 outbreak, visit virginia.gov/coronavirus.

Northam delays upcoming elections; others push for November alternatives

By Joseph Whitney Smith, Capital News Service

RICHMOND, Va -- Gov. Ralph Northam announced Wednesday that he is delaying the June congressional primaries by two weeks and is calling on the General Assembly to approve moving May elections to November.

“We have wrestled with our options and none of them are ideal or perfect,” Northam said. “Voting is a fundamental right, but no one should have to choose between protecting their health or casting a ballot.”

State legislators will have to sign off on the governor’s proposal to move the May local and special elections. Northam proposed that these races appear on the November ballot. All absentee ballots already cast would be discarded, the governor said. Additionally, those officials whose terms expire as of June 30 will continue in office until their successors have been elected in November.

The primary for Congressional races and a few local races has been postponed to June 23.

“As other states have shown, conducting an election in the middle of this global pandemic would bring unprecedented challenges and potential risk to voters and those who work at polling places across the Commonwealth,” Northam said.

Groups and state leaders have been calling for proactive measures such as mail-in voting for the upcoming Nov. 3 presidential election, fearing ongoing impact from the coronavirus pandemic. Virginia Democrats recently joined other Democratic groups nationwide calling on federal lawmakers to create voting alternatives for the presidential election due to the coronavirus outbreak. 

The groups are asking for provisions such as free or prepaid postage, allowing ballots postmarked by election day to count, in addition to extending early voting periods for in-person voting. Two possible alternatives to replace voting in person are mail-in and absentee ballots, according to Stephen Farnsworth, a professor at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg that specializes in media and elections.

Del. Jennifer Carroll Foy, D-Prince William, supports the idea of a universal mail-in ballot, regardless of the current pandemic. An MIT research study found that universal vote by mail cuts costs, increases turnout and improves election reliability. However, the success of these programs depends on transparency, accuracy and accessibility. Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, Washington and Utah have introduced mail-in only ballots.

“We need to take up this essential task of giving all Virginians an opportunity to participate in a safe and inclusive election,” Carroll Foy said in an email.The delegate recently filed paperwork to run for governor in 2021, according to the Virginia Mercury. 

Carroll Foy said the mail-in method is preferable to absentee voting because individuals need to opt in to register for absentee voting. Mail-in voting allows any registered voter to mail in their ballot without opting in, Carroll-Foy said. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, states using the mail-in method mail ballots to every registered voter, while absentee ballots are first requested and voters must qualify to receive the ballot. 

“We want to make sure that everyone feels safe and secure in these uncertain times, and that their constitutional rights are protected and easily accessed -- mail in ballots are the best to achieve both,” Carroll Foy said. 

Farnsworth believes it’s unlikely that the November U.S. presidential election will be delayed, but said voters may see changes at the polls.

“Even for states that don't make the switch away from largely in-person voting, you can expect much greater opportunities for no-excuse-required early and absentee voting,” Farnsworth said. 

During the General Assembly 2020 session, legislators passed House Bill 1 to allow a no excuse requirement to vote absentee. This removes prior requirements such as work, illness or travel to justify requesting an absentee ballot. 

Farnsworth said a mail-in only option is the most likely alternative over traditional in-person voting if the nation is still on lockdown in November. 

According to Anna Scholl, executive director of advocacy group Progress Virginia, postponing elections is the right move for Virginia voters.

“Postponing elections is a serious decision but it is the right move for our communities,” Scholl stated in a news release. “We strongly encourage the General Assembly to ratify this plan when they meet on April 22nd.”

The deadline to have an absentee ballot mailed for the June primary is June 2. Absentee ballot request forms can be found at www.vote.virginia.gov.

*CONSUMER ALERT* ATTORNEY GENERAL HERRING URGES VIRGINIANS TO REMAIN WARY OF COVID-19 SCAMS

~ Scammers are taking advantage of the coronavirus pandemic to try and take money from hardworking Virginians ~
 
RICHMOND (April 1, 2020) – Attorney General Mark R. Herring today issued a consumer alert urging Virginians to continue to be wary of COVID-19-related scams including federal stimulus related scams, cyber scams, telephone and text messaging scams, counterfeit product offers, bogus door-to-door tests and virus-related products, and phony charity donation requests.
 
“The sad truth is that we continue to see bad actors in Virginia and across the country taking advantage of the fear and uncertainty surrounding COVID-19 and trying to scam money from people,” said Attorney General Herring. “I again want to urge all Virginians to remain vigilant during this time and use common sense when you encounter seemingly too good to be true offers either online, over the phone or in person. Before purchasing any coronavirus related products or donating to any charities please do your research and make sure that you are giving your money to a legitimate business or organization.”
 
Last week, Attorney General Herring warned of scammers trying to get personal information as part of a new federal stimulus payment scam. There have been reports of scammers using the news that, as part of the federal stimulus package, the government will be sending one-time payments to millions of Virginians and Americans as an opportunity to try and steal personal information. These phishing scams will likely ask for things like bank account information under the guise of direct depositing money from the stimulus package into your bank account. Also, remember that the government will not ask you to pay any money up front to get a stimulus check. So if someone asks you to pay something, it’s a scam.
 
Utility or Government Imposter Scams
Many people are understandably very concerned when they get an e-mail, letter or phone call from someone identifying themselves as a representative of a government agency or one of their utility companies. Scammers are constantly improving their techniques to fool their intended victims into thinking they work for the government or utility, including fake identification and spoofed phone numbers on Caller ID. This scam employs the fear factor to lead you to part with your money or provide financial information to them. They may even threaten to have you arrested or cut off your electricity or water if you do not comply.
 
If someone reaches out to you saying they are from a government agency or a utility company DO NOT give your information to them over the phone. Instead find a legitimate phone number on the utility company or the government agency’s website and call them back to check and see if they actually need you to send them something.
 
Cyber Scams
Look out for emails claiming to be from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO), and other healthcare organizations, offering to share information about the virus. Do not open attachments or click on links within unknown emails, as scammers are using phony COVID-19 tracking websites to infect electronic devices with malware, putting residents at risk for identity theft and financial exploitation.
 
Take extra precaution to avoid spoofed or phony websites by only visiting websites with clearly distinguishable URL addresses. Scammers seek to exploit individuals by directing web traffic to similar, but falsely identified website names where they can provide misinformation or attempt to gain consumers’ personal information or finances in exchange for pandemic updates.
 
Be on the lookout for emails asking for the verification of personal data, including Medicare or Medicaid information, in exchange for receiving economic stimulus funds or other benefits from the government.  Government agencies are NOT sending out emails asking for residents’ personal information in order to receive funds or other pandemic relief opportunities.
 
Telephone and Text Messaging Scams
If you find that you’ve answered a robocall – Hang Up. Don’t press any numbers. Scammers are calling with offers involving everything from COVID-19 treatments and cures, to work-from-home schemes. The recording might say that pressing a number will direct you to a live operator or even remove you from their call list, but it also might lead to more robocalls.
 
Similar to email phishing scams, text messages from unknown sources may offer hyperlinks to what appears to be automated pandemic updates, or interactive infection maps.  These are just two examples of ways scammers can install malware on your mobile electronic device, putting you at increased risk for identity theft and financial exploitation.
 
Counterfeit Product Offers & High Demand Goods
Ignore offers for COVID-19 vaccinations and home test kits. There are currently no vaccines, pills, medications, or other prescription or over-the-counter products available to treat or cure the Coronavirus disease. This applies to offers made online, in stores, by electronic message, or over the phone. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not authorized any home test kits for COVID-19.
 
As many have seen firsthand, some consumer products are in extreme demand. Household cleaning products, sanitizers, personal hygiene products, and health and medical supplies may be offered via online or in-person sellers aiming to capitalize on under supplied or unavailable products. When buying online, be sure to research the seller by searching online for the person or company’s name, phone number and email address, plus words like “review,” “complaint,” or “scam.” If everything checks out, pay by credit card as opposed to debit, and keep a record of your transaction. 
 
If you are concerned about price gouging in your area, please reach out to Attorney General Herring’s Consumer Protection Section for investigation, as violations are enforceable by the Office of the Attorney General through the Virginia Consumer Protection Act.
 
Bogus Door to Door Tests and Virus-related Products
To ensure your personal safety, DO NOT answer the door or allow into your home or residence any unknown individuals or business representatives moving door-to-door offering to sell consumer products, medical kits, vaccines, cures, whole-home sanitization, or in-person COVID-19 testing. There are no FDA approved at-home tests, medicines, cures, vaccines, prescriptions or other coronavirus-related products and anything like this that someone is trying to sell is a scam.
 
Phony Charities & Donation Requests
Coming together in a time of need and extreme hardship is testament to the kindness of Virginians; however, when disasters and life changing events such as the current pandemic occur, be cautious as to where donations are going. Only give to charities and fundraisers you can confirm are reliable and legitimate. Scrutinize charities with consumer advocates or friends and find out how much of your donation will go to the charity's programs and services. Be especially cautious if you do not initiate contact with the charity. Beware of "copy-cat" names that sound like reputable charities. Some scammers use names that closely resemble those of respected, legitimate organizations.
 
Crowdfunding sites are particularly popular. Here are a few things to remember:
  • Check the creator or page owner's credentials and try to confirm its authenticity and seriousness.
  • Look for indicators of endorsement or legitimacy that the page is actually collecting donations for a particular victim or organization. Some sites offer verification and transparency measures for campaigns. Look for those markers of authenticity, and check out the site's fraud protection measures.
  • Be cautious, and if you feel uneasy, contribute to a more established charity in the community.
  • Be wary of charities that spring up overnight in connection with a current event or natural disaster. They may make a compelling case for you to make a donation but even if they are legitimate, they may not have the infrastructure or experience to get your donation to the affected area or people.
If a charity is soliciting contributions in Virginia, verify its registration with the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services' Office of Charitable and Regulatory Programs ("OCRP") at (804) 786-1343, or by searching OCRP's Charitable Organization Database online.
 
Remember these tips to avoid becoming a victim:
  • Never wire money or send cash or a pre-paid card—These transactions are just like sending someone cash! Once your money is gone, you can’t trace it or get it back.
  • Don’t give the caller any of your financial or other personal information—Never give out or confirm financial or other sensitive information, including your bank account, credit card, or Social Security number, unless you know exactly who you're dealing with. Scammers can use your information to commit identity theft. If you get a call about a debt that may be legitimate — but you think the collector may not be — contact the company to which the caller claims you owe money to inquire about the call.
  • Don’t trust a name or number—Scammers use official-sounding names, titles, and organizations to make you trust them. To make the call seem legitimate, scammers also use internet technology to disguise their area code or generate a fake name on caller ID. So even though it may look like they’re calling locally or somewhere in the United States, they could be calling from anywhere in the world.
  • Join the National Do Not Call Registry and don’t answer numbers you don’t know—This won’t stop scammers from calling but it should make you skeptical of calls you get from out of the blue. Most legitimate sales people generally honor the Do Not Call list. Scammers ignore it. Putting your number on the list helps to “screen” your calls for legitimacy and reduce the number of legitimate telemarketing calls you get.
Attorney General Herring advises consumers to watch out for the following red flags and to keep these tips in mind to avoid becoming a victim of consumer fraud:
  • The Offer Seems Too Good to be True—If it seems too good to be true, it almost certainly is. Examples include money left to you from an unknown relative, being awarded a loan or grant for which you did not apply, winning a lottery you did not enter and being selected to receive a share in funds in return for using your bank account.
  • Requests for Fees or Payment in Advance—Scammers will want advance payments or fees to clear the funds or complete their offer. It might not be clear what the fees are for, but the scammer will tell you they have to be paid or the money can’t be released. They might suggest they are only trying to help you out and the fees are a small sum compared to what you will be receiving. Never pay fees or taxes in advance.
  • Pressure—Scammers will often put pressure on their victims and urge them to pay immediately or lose the opportunity, or may even threaten them with legal consequences or disconnected utilities unless a payment is sent right away. A genuine business or government entity will not pressure you to act immediately.
  • Know who you are dealing with—Technology has made it easy for scammers to disguise or spoof their telephone number or create a website that looks very legitimate. Do an online search for the company name and website and look for consumer reviews. If you cannot find a seller’s physical address (not a P.O. Box) and phone number it should be a red flag. It is best to do business with websites you know and trust. If you buy items through an online auction, consider using a payment option that provides protection, like a credit card.
  • They Want Private Information—Many scams involve getting hold of your bank account details. Scams involving identity theft also seek personal information. A common scenario is an email supposedly from a bank asking you to click on a link to confirm your bank details and password. Banks generally don’t do this, but if you think the email has really come from your bank, pick up the phone and confirm with them. Never click on links or attachments in emails from people you don’t know or you risk your computer becoming infected by viruses, trojans, or other malware.
  • Untraceable Payment Method—Scammers prefer payment methods that are untraceable, such as wiring money through Western Union or other services. Be very suspicious of demands for wire transfers or cash payments. Never wire money to someone you do not know. 
  • Grammatical Errors or Poor Production Values—Scammers may be clever, but they are not always careful and English may not be their first language. Their grammatical errors can give them away. If the correspondence you receive is full of errors, low-resolution images, or unsophisticated formatting, be very suspicious.
  • Suspicious Email Domains and Web Addresses—Look carefully at email addresses and domain names. Businesses rarely use free email services like Hotmail, AOL, Yahoo, or Gmail. Even if the business seems legitimate, do some research to make sure they have readily available contact information and have not scammed others.
  • Suspicious or No Addresses—Scammers do not want their victims to know where they live. If there is no physical address and your contacts won’t give you one, it’s a sure bet you’re being scammed. If there is a physical address, check it out using the Internet or Google Earth and see if it’s a real address.
  • Request for Access to Your Computer—A common scam is a phone call from someone claiming to be a technician who has detected problems with your computer and would like to fix them for you free. Never give anyone remote access to your computer
If you think you have been a victim of a scam please reach out to Attorney General Herring’s Consumer Protection Section:

April, 2020, Update from Congressman Donald McEachin

These are incredibly challenging and scary times. We are all having to make great sacrifices to ensure that we defeat COVID-19 as quickly as possible. This means some parents are out of work, children are home from school, and families are isolating from one another to conquer this viral enemy.  I want you to know that while my staff and I are working remotely, we are all still hard at work and we are still here for you.

Most importantly, I want to update you on the legislation Congress recently passed to help people across the country during this pandemic. I was so pleased to be part of advocating for and passing the stimulus bill to help American families and business owners.

Our goal for this legislation – my goal – is to help people. Unfortunately, many Virginians are out of work, some are ill, and small business owners are trying to figure out how to make sure their business survives this pandemic. This bill will make a real difference to struggling families, suffering small businesses, and our overwhelmed health care system. This legislation will:

  • Give hospitals money to help them purchase desperately needed equipment and pay for free testing, which is desperately needed across the country.
  • Provide almost $400 billion for small businesses to survive these trying times. Businesses that maintain employees will be able to turn loans into grants, which will both help businesses stay afloat and keep more workers on the job.
  • Provide $260 billion for unemployment benefits so that out-of-work Americans will know they can pay rent and bills while they must stay home. The unemployment benefits include part time workers and gig workers and increases the benefits currently available.
  • To apply for this, contact the Virginia Unemployment office. Their telephone number is 1-866-832-2363 and they are available 8:15am to 4:30pm. More information is available on their website:  www.vec.virginia.gov.
  • Provide direct stimulus money to the vast majority of Americans. Individuals making less than $75,000 annually will receive $1200 and couples who file jointly and make under $150,000 combined income will receive $2400. Families will receive $500 for each child.  Those who make between $75,000 and $99,000 annually will receive a diminished amount on a sliding scale. This money will allow for folks to buy groceries, pay bills and hopefully ease some of the financial burden this outbreak has placed on individuals.

Our goal is to protect American families, keep Americans safe, while doing what we can to stimulate the economy. Please know that this is not the end. We recognize this is going to be a long haul and we will be vigilant. Protecting the future of this great nation and all Americans is our singular goal. I expect we will see additional legislation to help Americans and to ensure our economy comes back.

Additionally, researchers all over this country and around the world are working diligently to find a vaccine to offer protection from the novel coronavirus. Unfortunately, that is a prolonged process as vaccines require 12 to 18 months of development and testing. We certainly do not want to inject a healthy person with medication that could be harmful. At the same time, research is ongoing for therapeutics that will address the virus, mitigate its impacts, and diminish its severity. Because those medications are given to persons already quite ill and struggling, they do not require as much testing to be approved. When an individual is quite ill, taking chance on a novel drug is the compassionate and humane course if it can potentially save a life or ameliorate the outcome.

Please know that this is not the end. We recognize this is going to be a long haul and we will be vigilant. Protecting the future of this great nation and all Americans is our singular goal. I expect we will see additional legislation to help Americans and to ensure our economy comes back.

 I want to thank all the health care professionals, first responders, grocery and pharmacy workers, mail deliverers, garbage collectors, and all the others who continue to diligently do their jobs for the sake of all Virginians.

Lastly, let me reiterate that my office and I are here to help. If you need help with a federal agency or have a question about the bill, please go to my website at mceachin.house.gov.

Prep continues at old hospital site, precautions a constant at CMH

Editor’s Note: In an effort to inform our communities about changes at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital, we are releasing this additional information about the stand up of the old hospital building on Buena Vista Circle and precautions taken routinely by CMH in dealing with infectious diseases.

“As VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital continues to prep the old CMH on Buena Vista to possibly accept patients, we felt it was important to let the community know about precautions we at the hospital take daily to help control the spread of this virus and other infectious diseases and to protect our patients, staff and the community as a whole,” said Scott Burnette, CEO of CMH. 

He explained, “At CMH we have taken extensive precautions through the years to protect everyone from the spread of infectious diseases. That was true in 1954and it is true today, although medical research has provided us with many more tools over the years. There are important steps each and every employee takes to reduce the possibility of spreading a disease to patients, other staff members and the community.”

“We practice a strict regimen in what is called donning and doffing of personal protective equipment (PPE). Every employee who works in direct patient care has been specifically trained in this thorough procedure that protects everyone,” he said. 

This protective equipment includes disposable gowns, gloves, masks and eye protection. Further, as staff members put on (don) or take off (doff) the PPE, an observer is to be present to make sure the procedure is followed correctly.

“When infectious diseases are present and those diseases have an airborne component like COVID-19, patients are placed in what is called a negative pressure room or can be managed by leaving the patient room door closed to the hallway at all times,” he added. 

Negative pressure rooms bring in air from the hallway outside the room at all times and then the air in the room is exhausted through the roof at CMH where it dissipates and is no longer an issue. 

Burnette explained that if a COVID positive patient is in a negative pressure room, the airborne virus cannot escape the room except being expelled harmlessly through the roof.

Employees remove their PPE in a very specific manner at the door of the negative pressure room before exiting the room and wash their hands during each step of removing their equipment. This keeps those staff members and others safe from contact with the airborne virus.

Burnette explained that this procedure is utilized at hospitals across the country and is the accepted practice of the World Health Organization and the Centers For Disease Control with the federal government.

But he added that everyone has a responsibility to help slow or stop the spread of infectious diseases.

“The most important thing everyone can do is practice social distancing.  Six feet is the magic number.  Staying six feet away from people, being careful what you touch, avoid touching your face and washing your hands often with soap and water or sanitizer is the best way to slow or stop the progression of this virus,” Burnette said. 

Burnette said that the decision to prepare the old hospital to possibly receive patients was appropriate and necessary.

"Preparing the old hospital for COVID-19 patients is a precautionary step to make sure we have the capacity to handle any and all patients who present at CMH.  If precautions are not put into motion right now there could be a scenario where people in our community, our friends or family, could be in need of health care and CMH would not have room for them.  Having the CMH facility on Buena Vista Circle available as an option is a way to prevent this horrible scenario from taking place.  We are in the business of providing the best possible care for our patients and having this facility available to us will give us the best chance to do just that."  

If anyone has questions about COVID-19 they should visit the CDC website at: cdc.gov.

Spotlight on Jobs by the Virginia Employment Commission

 

General Labor:  Full-time factory worker/production worker positions. Will perform various job duties such as: grinding, polishing, waxing molds, packing, inspection; involves lifting and standing.  Job Order #1936760

 

Maintenance and Repair Workers, General:  Candidate will be moping, sweeping, breaking down boxes, taking out trash and general cleaning of the plant upon direction of the supervisor.  Job Order #1936765

 

Electrician I:  Responsibilities of this job will include providing electrical support in the manufacturing facility. The person holding this position will be a responder to service calls pertaining to electrical malfunctions in automated machinery within the plant. These malfunctions may be in various types of electrical devices, such as switches, electric valves, analog input or output devices, motors, wiring, or PLC/computer anomalies.  Job Order #1935876

 

Registered Nurse:  Work alongside and support technicians, other nurses, dietitians, social workers, physicians and the center manager. Deliver care to patients who are often dealing with multiple co-morbidities which require unique treatment plans and the ability to leverage a broad range of nursing skills and knowledge.   Job Order #1936094

Sales Representative:  Identifies and attracts new customers by introducing new products, services, and technologies while maintaining existing relationships in an effort to increase sales and exceed customer expectations. Sells products for manufacturer or distributor to business and industrial establishments or individuals at the sales office, store, showroom, or customer's place of business, etc.  Job Order #1935370

THESE AND ALL JOBS WITH THE VIRGINIA EMPLOYMENT COMMISSION CAN BE FOUND ONLINE AT

www.vawc.virginia.gov

The Virginia Employment Commission is An Equal Opportunity Employer/Program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities.

La Comision de Empleo de Virginia es un empleador/programa con igualdad de portunidades.  Los auxiliaries y servicios estan disponibles a dedido para personas con discapacidades

Jason Billy Vincent

April 18, 1974-April 1, 2020

It is with deepest sorrow that we say goodbye to Jason Billy Vincent, age 45, our beloved son, brother, family member, and friend who passed away suddenly on Wednesday, April 1, 2020 at his home in Skippers, VA.

Jason was born April 18, 1974, in Emporia, VA and he spent most of his life in nearby Skippers. Over the course of his career, Jason served in the US Army in Ft. Benning, GA where he attended Infantry Training and later worked with Bradley Fighter Vehicles.  After discharging from the Army, Jason worked in Computer Science, graduated from Welding School, and most notably in recent years worked in his family’s business, The Good Earth Peanut Company in Skippers, VA.

Those who knew Jason, even just a little, lost a shining light in their lives.

Jason will be sorely missed everyday by his father and mother, Lindsey Somner Vincent and Janet Scott Vincent; his sister, Claire Vincent (Brian Gilligan); his brother Benjamin Vincent; his nephew, Avett Gilligan; his loving aunts, uncles, cousins, and many, many wonderful friends.  Jason will also be greatly missed by his Good Earth Peanut Company “family” who he saw, loved, and worked with closely every day.

Jason is preceded in death by his paternal grandparents Billy Ben Vincent and Frances Somner Vincent and his maternal grandparents William Edmunds Tucker and Della Elder Tucker. 

Some of Jason’s favorite things were his dogs (and animals in general), Sun Drop, motorcycles, Chicken Tetrazzini, video games and listening to music.

Due to COVID-19 a private service will be held now, but a full memorial service is planned to honor Jason’s life once the COVID-19 social distancing bans are lifted.

Because of Jason’s love of animals, contributions in memory of Jason may be made to the non-profit organization, Luv4Pawz Animal Rescue, 552 North Main St., Emporia, VA 23847 or online @ luv4pawzrescue.org

Online Condolences can be sent to: www.wrennclarkehagan.com or echolsfuneralhome.com

Gale Poole Moore

October 24, 1942 - April 2, 2020

Gale Poole Moore, 77, died Thursday, April 2, 2020.

Gale was the daughter of the late Wesley C. “Jimmy” Poole and Ruby Wray Poole. In addition to her parents she was preceded in death by her beloved husband, Edward A. “Arnie” Moore, a brother, Clarence Wesley “Sonny or Little Jimmy” Poole, and a sister, Helen Poole Gibson.

Gale loved her Church and her Church Family, her work at Echols Funeral Home, where she was the Office Manager for over thirty years, she loved the beach, bingo, and travelling, but most of all she loved her daughter and grandson and her extended family.

Gale is survived by her loving daughter and grandson, Kimberly Moore Downing and Morey Ray Downing, both of Virginia Beach, a special grandson Ed Powell,  her brother, William Boyd Poole and his wife Lori of Emporia, cousin, Nancy Poole Reyes, an aunt, Mable Wray Mizzell of Petersburg, her sister in law, Jean Moore Bennett and her husband Alton, special nephews, Dean Moore and his wife Lori, Albert Calvin “Plug” Moore Jr. and his wife Susan, niece, Deanna Moore Babb and her husband Michael, and many more nieces and nephews who she loved dearly and a special friend, Reni Hobbs of Emporia.

A private Graveside Service will be held at Zion Baptist Church, where she will be laid to rest beside her beloved Husband Arnie. A public Celebration of Gale’s life will be held at a later time.

Echols Funeral Home is taking care of the arrangements, and online condolences may be left at echolsfuneralhome.com.

Dottie Williams

April 09, 1937 - April 01, 2020

Dottie Williams, 82, passed away Wednesday, April 1, 2020 at Mary View Hospital in Portsmouth, Virginia after a brief illness. She grew up on the family farm in Skippers that she loved so much.

Dottie was preceded in death by her parents, Thomas and Rachel; brothers, Billy ‘Wimp” and Freddie; her sister, Barbara Little and a nephew, Stacy Little. She is survived by her brothers, The Reverend Kenneth Williams (Shirley) of Newsoms, Virginia and Eddie Williams (Jo Ann) of Emporia; nieces, Nancy Jenkins (Whitey), Kathie Isles (Bobby), Penny Baugham (Lynn) and Tracy Williams; nephews, Wayne Williams (LeeAnn), Marlon Little (Sylvia) and Trent Williams (Dawn). She also is survived by numerous great-nieces and great-nephews; cousins and friends whom she loved dearly. Dottie greatly missed her church and her church family at Forest Hill Baptist Church after she moved to Courtland Health and Rehab. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com.

Meherrin Regional Library Remains Closed

Due to the current COVID-19 crisis the Meherrin Regional System will remain closed until further notice. This closure also includes the use of the library's meeting rooms. The library will not charge fines and item due dates will continue to be extended until normal operations resume. Wi-Fi continues to be available in parking spots closest to library entrances. If you have questions concerning your account or other library resources please email the library at mrlsweb@gmail.com. The library appreciates the patience and understanding of the community during this time. The Meherrin Regional Library includes the Brunswick County Library, Lawrenceville and the Richardson Memorial Library, Emporia.

VIRGINIA STATE POLICE ENFORCEMENT PRACTICES OF GOVERNOR’S EXECUTIVE ORDERS AND DIRECTIVES

RICHMOND – The Virginia State Police encourages all Virginians to adhere to Virginia Governor Northam’s directives and do their part by staying home in order to best mitigate the exposure and spread of COVID-19 within the Commonwealth. State troopers, for their personal protection and for the safety of the public, are minimizing their direct contact with the public. All Department recruitment events, public presentations, training, ceremonies, etc., have all been canceled or postponed through June 10, 2020.

Governor Northam has directed state and local law enforcement to initially address violations of the following Executive Order 53 and Executive Order 55 directives with education and warnings. Persistent violation of these Executive Order (EO) directives can result in an individual(s) or business being charged with a class one misdemeanor, which carries up to a year in jail and $2,500 fine:

  • Prohibition of all public and private in-person, indoor and outdoor gatherings of more than 10 individuals – with the exception of the operation of businesses not required to close under EO 53 and the gathering of family members living in the same residence;
  • Closure of all dining and congregation areas in restaurants, dining establishments, food courts, breweries, microbreweries, distilleries, wineries, tasting rooms and farmers markets;
  • Any brick and mortar retail business (not listed in paragraph 5 of EO 53) failing to limit all in-person shopping to no more than 10 patrons per establishment. If any such business cannot adhere to the 10-patron limit with proper social distancing requirements, it must close.
  • Closure of all public access to recreational and entertainment businesses;
  • Closure of public beaches for all activity, except for exercising and fishing;
  • Cancellation of in-person classes and instruction at institutions of higher education;
  • Cessation of all reservations for overnight stays of less than 14 nights at all privately-owned campgrounds

 Virginia State Police have been and will continue to assess Virginia EO violations on a case-by-case basis.

 State police is required to uphold the laws of the Commonwealth and will continue to have a visible presence within our communities and on the roads for the safety of those living, working and traveling in Virginia. The law still requires law enforcement to have reasonable suspicion to initiate a traffic stop on a vehicle. Virginia State Police will not be making random traffic stops on vehicles nor conducting checkpoints to determine if a driver is traveling for a permissible reason, as granted by EO 53 and EO 55.

The current Governor’s Executive Orders related to COVID-19:

  • Do not require an individual to carry documentation related to one’s purpose of travel;
  • Do not close Virginia roads/interstates to Virginia residents;
  • Do not restrict non-Virginia residents from traveling into and/or through Virginia;
  • Do not prevent Virginians from traveling out of the state. State police does encourage any Virginian(s) traveling out-of-state to check, in advance, the other state(s) for any travel restrictions in effect for that state(s). Governor Northam has advised Virginians returning from out-of-state and/or international travel to self-quarantine for at least 14 days.

For any additional questions related to the statewide “Stay at Home” order, please go to www.virginia.gov/coronavirus/faq.

Virginia Legal Aid Society Remains Open During Outbreak

During the COVID-19 outbreak, Virginia Legal Aid Society is remaining open for business, using law to resolve problems affecting the basics of life for low-income families and individuals.  Lawline, our telephone intake and advice system, will remain open during its normal business hours: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., at 866-534-5243 (866-LEGL-AID). VLAS urges everyone to call rather than visit, if possible, to help keep everyone safe.    

VLAS's five offices in Lynchburg, Danville, Martinsville, Farmville and Suffolk will remain open by appointment and during limited open business hours.  Visitors should contact their local office prior to visiting in order to confirm hours of public access. The Lynchburg office is open to the public from 9 a.m.-noon weekdays; the other offices are open from 9-11 a.m. These hours are subject to change.

VLAS’s mission is to resolve the serious legal problems of low-income people, promote economic and family stability, reduce poverty through effective legal assistance, and to champion equal justice.

Riparian Woman’s Club Scholarship Applications

The Riparian Woman’s Club is pleased to present two scholarships to qualifying seniors. The club has participated in the scholarship program for many years.

Applications are available via email. Please email news@emporianews.com to have your contanct information forwarded.

To be eligible for consideration, the applicant must:

  • Be a High School Senior;
  • Be a resident of Greensville County, the City of Emporia or the Town of Jarratt, Virginia;
  • Submit a completed Scholarship Application to the Riparian Woman’s Club Scholarship Committee no later than the deadline date specified; Monday, April 27th, 2020 ;
  • Submit a signed Teacher Recommendation Form;
  • Submit a High School Transcript, to include SAT Scores, as well as Class Rank.

Applications may be turned in to guidance counselors by no later than Monday, April 27, 2020.

Help Children by Having Fun Golfing

Help children at Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services who suffer from mental health and/or substance use disorders while having fun golfing.

Jackson-Feild will host its 25th Annual Golf Tournament on May 4 at the Golf Club at the Highlands in Chesterfield County.  Over the past 24 years, this tournament has raised $538,520 to meet a variety of operating and capital needs that benefitted its children.

The proceeds this year will be used to improve upgrade much-needed infrastructure projects on campus.

 Jackson-Feild seeks raise $30,000 from the tournament to meet these needs.

The cost to pay is $150 per player, or $600 for a team.  Lunch is provided at noon, and a banquet at the close of play. Play begins at 1:00 p.m.  with shotgun start.

Jackson-Feild’s mission is to provide high-quality evidence-based services for children who have suffered severe emotional trauma, mental illness, and/or struggling with addiction. The goal is to restore wellness so that children can successfully return home to their community.

For more information, call Tod Balsbaugh at 804-354-6929 or tbalsbaugh@jacksonfeild.org.  You may register by phone or on our website at www.jacksonfeild.org.

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