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Career Opportunity

Residential Counselors

(Youth Service Workers)

If you are interested in making a positive impact on the lives of Virginia’s youth, then we want you to become part of our Team!  Residential Treatment Facility located in Jarratt, Virginia seeks positive role models to work directly with adolescent boys and girls in a residential treatment program.  The Youth Service Worker is responsible for role-modeling healthy behavior and teaching life skills.  This is a full-time position.

Must possess the availability to work weekends, evenings, and holidays.  Flexibility is a must.  Seeking candidates with experience working in the department of corrections (adult or juvenile), or working with youth in the community or in a formal setting.   A Bachelors’ degree is preferred but NOT Required.  Starting pay ranges from $12.50 to $14.00/hr. depending upon experience and credentials.  Shift differential is provided for week-day evening shift and for first and second shifts on the weekend.

Compensation package includes 401(k) retirement plan & employer sponsored health, dental, vision & life insurance.  JBHS is a Drug Free Workplace.  Successful applicants must pass a pre-employment drug screen and criminal background screening.  EOE.  Positions open until filled.

E-mail cover letter and resume to:

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services
Attn: Chris Thompson
Job # 2018-16
E-mail:careers@jacksonfeild.org

GREENSVILLE/EMPORIA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES

LOCAL BOARD MEETING

The Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services Administrative Board will meet on Thursday, October 18, 2017, at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services located at 1748 East Atlantic Street.  The public is welcome to attend.

October is National Domestic Violence Awarness Month

The Family Violence/Sexual Assault Unit program strives to empower and support survivors of domestic and sexual assault. The goal is to help them make choices that will enable them to live productive lives without fear and violence. The Family Violence/Sexual Assault Unit Child Advocacy Center provides support and services to children who frequently are exposed to the same abusive behavior giving them a voice because often abused children are left feeling they have no voice and that no one is listening when they do speak.

The Unit’s values include Safety, Prevention, Accountability, Diversity/Equality, Collaboration, Education, Empowerment/Autonomy and Leadership. The Family Violence and Sexual Assault Unit has combated the effects of domestic violence and sexual assault; ultimately empowering victims in becoming survivors.

WE INVITE YOU TO JOIN US AS WE RECOGNIZE

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH!

PLEASE ATTEND/PARTICIPATE IN THE EVENTS LISTED BELOW!

October 5, 2018, 10AM, The Domestic Violence Awareness Walk

Meet at the Veteran’s Park, behind Emporia Post Office at 9:45 am, walk will begin at 10 am

 

October 18, 2018, 7 PM     The Candle Light Vigil

Main Street United Methodist Church

500 S Main Street

Emporia, VA 23847

 

October 31, 2018, 6 PM – 8 PM      Trunk or Treat       

Veteran’s Park      

Emporia, VA 23847

Please call 434 -348 - 0100 for additional information

VSU Welcomes New Hires in 4-H, Forestry and Operations

Virginia State University (VSU) is pleased to announce the addition of three new personnel who have joined Cooperative Extension and the College of Agriculture. Chantel Wilson, Ph.D., has joined as 4-H STEAM Extension specialist, Jerry Bettis Sr., Ph.D., has joined as forestry Extension specialist, and Ronald Howell has rejoined the College of Agriculture as director of Operations Management reporting to Dean M. Ray McKinnie.

“We are thrilled to welcome two new specialists to our Extension family. The addition of Dr. Chantel Wilson will enable us to enhance our capacity to engage youth in agriculture through our 4-H program. Dr. Jerry Bettis will provide expertise to foresters and Virginians interested in trees and forests,” said Dr. McKinnie. “And we are pleased to welcome back Ronald Howell to VSU. He will provide guidance and direction for College of Agriculture strategic operating plans, projects and initiatives.”

 “I’m excited for the chance to ‘give back’ by developing programming to help prepare young people for success in a changing world,” said Dr. Wilson. “Programs such as 4-H can have a tremendous positive influence on the lives of young people. I believe that my participation in a youth agricultural program helped me to develop career aspirations and the skills needed for my success, eventually leading me to become the first person in my family to graduate from college.”

Dr. Wilson earned a Ph.D. in crop and soil environmental sciences from Virginia Tech, and an M.S. in plant pathology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She intends to work with stakeholders to determine community needs and the skills young people need for success in STEAM fields. STEAM in this instance stands for science, technology, engineering, agriculture and math. “I hope to channel my creativity and passion to develop fun, informative and useful programming based on current research,” she said. “My ultimate goals are to generate interest in STEAM fields, strengthen scientific literacy and to empower youth by showing them how to reach their career goals.” 

Dr. Wilson is also a Virginia certified turf and landscape nutrient management planner. Before joining VSU, she served as urban nutrient management Specialist at Virginia Tech contracted to the Virginia Dept. of Conservation and Recreation, and as a graduate research assistant/teaching scholar at Virginia Tech. Dr. Wilson joins VSU’s 4-H Extension specialist Dr. Maurice Smith, who specializes in youth development, citizenship and leadership development.

Dr. Bettis Sr. expressed his enthusiasm for becoming part of Cooperative Extension’s rich history of educating and training Virginia landowners. “I hope my first accomplishments are to teach and train underserved landowners to seek the services of a consulting forester and use a written contract prepared by a consulting forester when selling timber,” he said. “If each landowner in Virginia does this when selling timber, I would consider my tenure at VSU stellar!”

Dr. Bettis holds a Ph.D. in forestry from North Carolina State University. Before joining VSU, he served as forestry-natural resources Specialist at Tuskegee University, and as early rotation forester and raw materials representative at the Weyerhaeuser Company in New Bern, NC, where he was responsible for fire, vegetation and pest control on approximately 500,000 acres of timberland. 

Ronald Howell, a USDA scholar and VSU alum, said, “I am excited about my new position and to give back to my alma mater and the college that has made a huge impact on my life personally and professionally. Being back at Virginia State University and a part of the College of Agriculture allows me to share my passion for agricultural sciences and work with the faculty members and staff who afforded me so many opportunities as a student and who helped launch my career.”

Howell, who earned his master’s degree in agriculture and Extension education-community development from Virginia Tech, will be integral to the administration of budgets, developing management procedures and implementing new business processes. He will also provide administrative leadership to Randolph Farm and have oversight for the 1890 Facilities Grant Program. And through a partnership agreement, he will serve as a special advisor to the Office of the Secretariat of Agriculture and Forestry to increase land-grant capacity for outreach, student development and build strategic partnerships and initiatives that improve the stability and sustainability of farm and forestland owners in Virginia. Howell has held several positions with USDA and with the Commonwealth of Virginia, each time at a greater level of responsibility.

Extension is a joint program of Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and state and local governments. Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

SBA Small Business Lending Momentum Continues in FY18

~SBA FY18 total loan volume reaches more than $30 billion with more than 72,000 approved loans~

 

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Small Business Administration announced FY18 lending numbers showing that it guaranteed over $30 billion to small businesses that otherwise would not have had access to capital.

“We are providing tools, resources and access to capital for America’s 30 million small businesses, and our FY18 numbers bear that out,” SBA Administrator Linda McMahon said. “SBA’s 7(a) and 504 loan programs have never been more dynamic, easy to use and accessible—helping small businesses succeed and thrive.  Our loan programs in FY18 continue to show strong performance, and we believe the President’s tax cuts and deregulatory actions will help more small businesses grow and prosper in the coming year.”

In FY18 there were approximately 60,353 7(a) loans made, with a total dollar amount of $25.37 billion. The 7(a) program is SBA’s flagship program, which offers guarantees on loans to small businesses of up to $5 million on reasonable terms and conditions. 7(a) loans are commonly used for acquiring land, purchasing equipment, or working capital.

The SBA’s 504 loan program had another year of high performance for lending, with 5,874 loans made for a total dollar amount of over $4.75 billion. In FY18 SBA launched the 25-year Debenture, which offers an extra 60 months of financing at a fixed rate for small businesses. Since its introduction in April, over 1,000 debentures had been sold by the end of September.

“The 25-year Debenture is designed to help free up cash flow and offer fixed rates in a rising interest rate environment for 504 borrowers and we are pleased to see over $1 billion has been disbursed in less than six months,” Associate Administrator for SBA’s Office of Capital Access William Manger said.

In FY18 there was significant growth in the SBA’s smaller loans, including a record volume of dollars lent in the Microloan and Community Advantage Programs. Specifically, over 5,000 loans were approved for over $72 million in the Microloan program and over 1,000 loans for over $150 million in SBA’s Community Advantage program.

The SBA continued to innovate and improve processes by leveraging enhanced technologies. Lender Match is an SBA technology platform that gives entrepreneurs the ability to complete a quick online form, without registration or cost, and be connected with an approved SBA lender within 48 hours. To date, Lender Match has generated 3.6 million leads on behalf of small businesses to our lenders and over 160,000 unique borrowers have been contacted by lenders with financing options. 

Another technological innovation was the development of the SBA’s Franchise Directory, which was launched this year and has resulted in an over 50 percent increase in eligible franchise brands. There are currently 3,192 brands on the Franchise Directory. When the directory was first published in October 2017 there were only 2,034 brands.  In FY18, SBA has seen a year over year increase of over 21 percent in 7(a) and 504 dollars going to franchises.

For more information about SBA’s loan programs, financial assistance and other services, visit www.sba.gov.

 

Justin Owen of Skippers Completes SVCC PLW Program

Justin Owen of Skippers and a graduate of Greensville County High School, completed the Southside Virginia Community College Power Line Worker Training Program on September 19, 2018.

The 11-week program provides both classroom and hands-on training in safety, climbing techniques, electrical theory, aerial framing, rigging, Operation Utility Service Equipment and Commercial Driver’s License Training.

SVCC offers the Power Line Worker class in Blackstone Virginia at the Occupational/Technical Center in Pickett Park. For information, southside.edu.

Power Line Worker Students from the eighth class of the SVCC Training Program

Front L-R  Wayne Gates of Petersburg, Chase Simon of Meherrin, George Blackwell of Lunenburg, David Rios of Farmville, Justin Owen of Skippers, Brandon Chumley of Red Oak, Logan Branch of Gladstone, Alex Hite of Kenbridge, Nick Plutro of Carson, Alex Rothgeb of Clarksville, Justin Perez of King George, Brad Wike, Instructor

Back L-R:  Clyde Robertson, Instructor  Adam Ashmore of Disputanta, Charlie Herrin of Oakton, Luke Swanson of Winchester, Nate Trevillian of Monroe, Zac Cavezza of Suffolk, Cole Shornak of Chester, Brian Burch of Crewe, Ian Banker of New Ellenton, SC, Blake Spangler of Salem, and Nick Grigg (Student Instructor)

Building for a Promising Future

By Dr. Al Roberts

Established in 1970, Southside Virginia Community College is one of 23 colleges in the Virginia Community College System. From its humble beginnings, the college has grown to become the leading provider of quality academic and workforce services within the largest community college jurisdiction in our state. The college’s 4,200-square mile service region spans ten counties and also encompasses the city of Emporia.

Meeting the need for education services across such a broad area requires a wide range of diverse options. Consequently, the college serves students from two main campuses, five education centers, and other off-campus sites, as well as through online learning opportunities. The college’s Christanna campus in Alberta currently has six permanent buildings. The John H. Daniel Campus in Keysville has four permanent buildings, including its Learning Resource Center/Student Services building, a 32,700-sqare foot structure completed in 2014. All combined, the college maintains 220,000 square feet of building facilities, 88% of which is allocated for instructional and student use.

And SVCC continues to grow. The college is among the leaders in Virginia’s FastForward workforce credentialing program. Innovative services to help ensure student success continue to be deployed, and connections with area business and industry partners continue to expand.

The college is also growing physically. In September, construction began on a new, two-level Learning Resource Center on the Christanna Campus. The new facility will expand the college’s infrastructure in order to provide exceptional resources for mission-critical activities. When completed in January 2020, the 45,000-square-foot building will house the Christanna Campus library, and it will provide performance space, a food service area, student study and lounge areas, a workout room, and a welcome area. It will also feature a Career Center, a Veterans’ Center, a Credentialing Center, and an IT Training Laboratory. Student services, including financial aid, admissions and records, and IT support, will also be relocated to the new building.

The new Learning Resource Center will play a vital role in the lives of students for semesters and years to come. SVCC offers 23 degrees at the associate level, a host of shorter-term academic and workforce development programs, opportunities for dually enrolled high school students, adult basic education, and other transitional services for non-traditional students. In addition, a comprehensive team of academic advisors, tutors, student services professionals, and counselors are available to help students develop their academic strengths and tackle challenges.

At SVCC, we believe in the transformative power of education to positively impact individual students and the communities we serve. To learn more about how to build your educational future at SVCC, visit the college’s website at Southside.edu or call 434-949-1000. Our team of academic and workforce advisors can help you discover how to create your own promising future.

Dr. Al Roberts is president of Southside Virginia Community College, an institution of higher learning that provides a wide variety of education opportunities to a diverse student population within a service area that spans ten counties and the city of Emporia. He can be reached via email at al.roberts@southside.edu.

Breast Cancer – Symptoms, Treatment and More

~Community Out-Reach Education~

South Hill – Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women worldwide.  Each year, breast cancer accounts for 12 percent of all cancers diagnosed globally, and is the second leading cause of cancer-related death among women.  What are causes, symptoms and stages of breast cancer?  What are current treatments and the newest research related to breast cancer?  What are breast cancer risk factors?

If you are seeking answers to questions like these you should attend October’s C.O.R.E. (Community Out-Reach Education) Program at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital to learn about breast cancer.

This FREE program will be on Monday, October 22nd at 4:00 p.m. in the VCU Health CMH Education Center inside the new C.A.R.E. Building located at 1755 N. Mecklenburg Avenue in South Hill.

The speaker for the program with be Dr. Masey Ross.  Dr. Ross specializes in oncology, the branch of medicine that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer.  Dr. Ross received her medical degree from Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago, IL.  She completed her residency and internship as well as a fellowship from VCU Medical Center in Richmond, VA.  Dr. Ross evaluates, diagnoses and coordinates care for patients at the Hendrick Cancer and Rehab Center in South Hill; at VCU Medical Center North Hospital and Stony Point 9000 in Richmond.

Reservations are not required for this program; however, they are recommended.  For more information or to register to attend, please call (434) 447-0854 or visitwww.vcu-cmh.org.

More Uses for $222,050

These are the suggestions that have arrived via e-mail and been made in person:

  • Sidewalks all the way to Wal-Mart and Food Lion.
  • Sidewalks along Commomwealth Blvd.
  • Sidewalks along ALL of Main Street
  • A Playground near the I-95/US 58 interchange.
  • Bolster JOB CREATION and ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.
  • More funding for the Public Schools.
  • Five-day-per-week access to the General Registrar (Why should people not be able to register to vote Monday-Friday?).
  • Longer hours for the Treasurer, so that those working out of town can pay in person, even if only one night per week.
  • An ATM like kiosk for payments to the City (Water Bills, Taxes, etc).
  • Electronic Billing as opposed to just automatic bank draft for payments to the City (without any fees, other cities do it).
  • Creating Mulch/Compost from yard waste and allowing Citizens to use resulting product (an idea that might save money if the City could stop purchasing mulch).
     

This list will be updated and added to as more suggestions arrive.

In the meantime, visit this page for the e-mail addresses of your City Council Member. You can also drop a letter to The Clerk to City Council, PO Box 511, Emporia, Virginia 23847. The Clerk to City Council may be reached by phone at (434)634-7309 and City Administration may be reached at (434)634-3332.

Tags: 

What would you do with $222,050? ***UPDATED***

Editor's Note: According to the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development, Emporia is the most fiscally stressed locality in the Commonwealth. There is no city or county in the Commonwealth with a higher fiscal stress rating.

A former menmber of the Civic Center Foundation just informed EmporiaNews.com that that group raised the money and paid to remove the asbestos from the Auditorium. The fact that the asbestos has already been abated, at great expense to the Civic Center Foundation, is yet one more reasons to leave the building standing.

There have been several e-mails sent to the editor echoing the sentiments of this article.

THERE IS NO JUSTIFIABLE REASON FOR THE EMPORIA CITY COUNCIL TO WASTE THE AMOUNT OF MONEY BUGETED ($210,000), PLUS AN ADDITIONAL $12,050 TO "SAVE" PARTS OF THE BUILDING THAT HAVE BEEN DEEMED IMPORTANT BY THE VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES.

Once again, the Emporia City council has decided to waste your money tearing down a perfectly good building.

Please don’t get me wrong, it’s not a spectacular building it has no major architectural character, but it’s ours.  It’s a symbol of a time when our country could come together can put everyone to work.

The building in question is the auditorium on Main Street.  All that remains of the former school complex.  This particular building was built as a Works Progress Administration project in the midst of the great depression if.  The Auditorium is one of three WPA project within the city of Emporia, the others are in close proximity - the Post Office and the Armory.

I say again, it is not a spectacular building, but it is important history.  More importantly, it’s not eating anything nor is it drinking anything.  The city is expanding minimal funds in maintenance, and the building is not connected to any utilities except water and sewer; and those are most likely not being used.

One can imagine countless school assemblies, Christmas programs, concerts and the like being held in this auditorium.  In its more recent history it was the first home of the Meherrin River arts council.  Just like the Victorian school buildings that once stood beside it, this building is part of our history.

It was suggested to a member of City council that the school buildings and auditorium would make an excellent City Hall.  This was several years ago before the schools were torn down.  There was enough space in those buildings to house all of the offices of our city government, and have banquet halls that would rival those of golden leaf commons.  The police department could move into the existing City Hall, or it could have been used as a new library. 

That suggestion fell on deaf ears and two perfectly useful buildings were demolished.

We can listen the City Council share concerns about asbestos, but I saw no asbestos abatement when the schools were torn down.  We can listen to city council when they talk about how it’s a drain on our resources, but as mentioned above the building is connected to no utilities and receives only very minimal maintenance.

One can listen to the City Council until one is blue in the face and one will probably never know the real reason why that August body is so determined to demolish this building.

City council is budgeted more than $220,000 for the task of removing a perfectly useful building, which according to their own architectural review is in good condition and is costing us nothing. 

Just two weeks before the meeting at which City Council decided to waste this money, they entered into a lease/purchase agreement for three vehicles.  That agreement was for $154,000.  By not demolishing the auditorium, the interest payments on at least purchase arrangement could be saved and the city could pay cash outright for those three vehicles.

Much-needed police vehicles aside, $222,050 could pay for much needed expansion and upgrades at the library or even just pay for more computers and additional hours.

$222,050 would more than cover the $172,000 needed to replace our 911 call handling equipment.  The balance could be used to cover the 2% COLA raises for city employees, which total $10,955 according to the most current budget.

In the time that I’ve lived here water bills have more than tripled and sanitation fees have nearly quadrupled.  $222,050 would surely put a dent in the debt service that caused those bills to soar out of control, or the very least pay off whenever debt remains on that new garbage truck. $222,050 would go a very long way toward replacing the water meters in the City, a task that is in dire need of undertaking.

Just looking at the budget, one can see many opportunities to constructively spend $222,050.

Without even leaving the school property, $222,050 would go a long towards making the auditorium and the cafeteria viable for event rental.  In light of the doubling the fees at golden leaf commons, organizations such the family violence and domestic assault unit could continue to use a low-cost facility for their fundraising (or no cost, as this program is administered as a city department).

Knowing that you, the average citizen of the city of Emporia, could pay down your debt, complete existing projects, or avoid incurring new debt, how would you spend $222,050?

The city of Emporia is currently one of the most fiscally stressed localities in the commonwealth of Virginia.  We cannot afford to allow our City Council to squander our money.  The fiscally conservative option is to spare this building demolition and find a useful purpose for it.  No matter what anyone else, especially if they claim to be fiscally conservative, the demolition of the WPA Auditorium on Main Street is not fiscally conservative.

Further, anyone who claims to be fiscally conservative and voted for the demolition of the structure, which is clearly a waste of taxpayer revenue, is not fiscally conservative.

Should the Emporia City Council proceed with the demolition of the Auditorium, or is the money better spent elswhere?

Spotlight on Jobs by the Virginia Employment Commission

Shift Supervisor: Coordinate/Supervise production efforts that drive improvement in all associated work processes affected ESH, complianc3e, reliability, quality, production, and costs. Monitor product quality, assist with troubleshooting, provide safety training and coaching. HSD/GED and 2 or more years experience in an industrial, manufacturing or military environment.  Job Order#1439882

Residential Counselor (Youth Service Worker):  Responsible for role-modeling healthy behavior and teaching life skills to adolescent boys and girls in a residential treatment program. Bachelors degree preferred but not required. Valid driver’s license required. Job Order #1451145

Lathe Technician: HSD/GED required and 1 yr. experience working in an industrial/manufacturing environment.  Will perform on site diagnosis, analysis and resolution of problems. Job Order #1443112

Security Officer: Be at least 18 (21 for some positions). HSD/GED required. Able to work various shifts including weekends/holidays. Patrol various areas to ensure personal, building, and equipment security. Job Order#1446904

Truck Driver:  Must possess a CDL-A with tank and hazmat endorsements and at least 24 months experience.  Excellent driving record a must.  Age 20 or more.. Job Order#1443336

THESE AND ALL JOBS WITH THE VIRGINIA EMPLOYMENT COMMISSION CAN BE FOUND ONLINE AT

www.vawc.virginia.gov

"What Parade"

Lots of peanuts and wrapped candy
did away with our big parade
there was nothing that showed to be creative
like when those big beautiful floats were made.
 
I think I saw enough cars and trucks
to fill up most parking lots
yes and I saw children hanging on to tailgates
in far too many spots.
 
We used to have some bands that played
and marchers that could march
the uniforms that most did wear
needed a bit more starch.
 
What used to be a tribute
to the peanut farmers for whom we care
has turned into an election line
with politician cars everywhere.
 
I think a feasibility study is in order
to see which way you’re going
if this is a tribute to our farmers
you have a funny way of showing.
 
                             Roy E. Schepp

Lake Gaston Baptist Church Adventurers Annual Arts and Craft Fair Saturday November 3, 2018 9:00 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The lake community always looks forward to this annual Arts and Craft Fair, now in it’s 11th year and featuring over 50 vendors!

All items are handcrafted by local and regional artists and designers. Admission is free and drawings for door prizes are held throughout the day. Shoppers will receive shopping bags with a few goodies inside while supplies last. Lunch, snacks and beverages will be available for purchase.

Don’t miss this opportunity to shop for unique handcrafted items!

Interested vendors may contact Lynne Sanders at sanders.lynne@gmail.com or Teresa Freeman at 252-532-3027

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